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Chapter: 12th Physics : Electromagnetic Induction and Alternating Current

Faraday’s Experiments on Electromagnetic Induction

Faraday’s Law of Electromagnetic Induction

Faraday’s Experiments on Electromagnetic Induction 


First Experiment

Consider a closed circuit consisting of a coil C of insulated wire and a galvanometer G as shown in Figure 4.2(a). The galvanometer does not indicate deflection as there is no electric current in the circuit.

When a bar magnet is inserted into the stationary coil, with its north pole facing the coil, there is a momentary deflection in the galvanometer. This indicates that an electric current is set up in the coil (Figure 4.2(b)). If the magnet is kept stationary inside the coil, the galvanometer does not indicate deflection (Figure 4.2(c)).

The bar magnet is now withdrawn from the coil, the galvanometer again gives a momentary deflection but in the opposite direction. So the electric current flows in opposite direction (Figure 4.2(d)). Now if the magnet is moved faster, it gives a larger deflection due to a greater current in the circuit (Figure 4.2(e))

The bar magnet is reversed i.e., the south pole now faces the coil. When the above experiment is repeated, the deflections are opposite to that obtained in the case of north pole (Figure 4.2(f)).


If the magnet is kept stationary and the coil is moved towards or away from the coil, similar results are obtained. It is concluded that whenever there is a relative motion between the coil and the magnet, there is deflection in the galvanometer, indicating the electric current setup in the coil.


Second Experiment

Consider two closed circuits as shown in Figure 4.3(a). The circuit consisting of a coil P, a battery B and a key K is called as primary circuit while the circuit with a coil S and a galvanometer G is known as secondary circuit. The coils P and S are kept at rest in close proximity with respect to one another.

If the primary circuit is closed, electric current starts flowing in the primary circuit. At that time, the galvanometer gives a momentary deflection (Figure 4.3(a)).

After that, when the electric current reaches a certain steady value, no deflection is observed in the galvanometer.

Likewise if the primary circuit is broken, the electric current starts decreasing and there is again a sudden deflection but in the opposite direction (Figure 4.3(b)). When the electric current becomes zero, the galvanometer shows no deflection.

From the above observations, it is concluded that whenever the electric current in the primary circuit changes, the galvanometer shows a deflection.



Faraday’s Law of Electromagnetic Induction

From the results of his experiments, Faraday realized that

whenever the magnetic flux linked with a closed coil changes, an emf (electromotive force) is induced and hence an electric current flows in the circuit. This current is called an induced current and the emf giving rise to such current is called an induced emf. This phenomenon is known as electromagnetic induction.


Based on this idea, Faraday’s experiments are understood in the following way. In the first experiment, when a bar magnet is placed close to a coil, some of the magnetic field lines of the bar magnet pass through the coil i.e., the magnetic flux is linked with the coil. When the bar magnet and the coil approach each other, the magnetic flux linked with the coil increases. So this increase in magnetic flux induces an emf and hence a transient electric current flows in the circuit in one direction (Figure 4.4(a)).


At the same time, when they recede away from one another, the magnetic flux linked with the coil decreases. The decrease in magnetic flux again induces an emf in opposite direction and hence an electric current flows in opposite direction (Figure 4.4(b)). So there is deflection in the galvanometer when there is     a relative motion between the coil and the magnet.

In the second experiment, when the primary coil P carries an electric current, a magnetic field is established around it. The magnetic lines of this field pass through itself and the neighbouring secondary coil S.

When the primary circuit is open, no electric current flows in it and hence the magnetic flux linked with the secondary coil is zero (Figure 4.5(a)).

However, when the primary circuit is closed, the increasing current builds up a magnetic field around the primary coil. Therefore, the magnetic flux linked with the secondary coil increases. This increasing flux linked induces a transient electric current in the secondary coil (Figure 4.5(b)). When the electric current in the primary coil reaches a steady value, the magnetic flux linked with the secondary coil does not change and the electric current in the secondary coil will disappear.


Similarly, when the primary circuit is broken, the decreasing primary current induces an electric current in the secondary coil, but in the opposite direction (Figure 4.5(c)). So there is deflection in the galvanometer whenever there is a change in the primary current.

The conclusions of Faraday’s experiments are stated as two laws.


First law

Whenever magnetic flux linked with a closed circuit changes, an emf is induced in the circuit.


Second law

The magnitude of induced emf in a closed circuit is equal to the time rate of change of magnetic flux linked with the circuit.

If the magnetic flux linked with the coil changes by B in a time dt, then the induced emf is given by


The negative sign in the above equation gives the direction of the induced current which will be dealt with in the next section. If a coil consisting of N turns is tightly wound such that each turn covers the same area, then the flux through each turn will be the same. Then total emf induced in the coil is given by


Here, B is called flux linkage, defined as the product of number of turns N of the coil and the magnetic flux linking each turn of the coil ΦB.

 

EXAMPLE 4.3

A cylindrical bar magnet is kept along the axis of a circular solenoid. If the magnet is rotated about its axis, find out whether an electric current is induced in the coil.

Solution

The magnetic field of a cylindrical magnet is symmetrical about its axis. As the magnet is rotated along the axis of the solenoid, there is no induced current in the solenoid because the flux linked with the solenoid does not change due to the rotation of the magnet.

 

EXAMPLE 4.4

A closed coil of 40 turns and of area 200 cm2, is rotated in a magnetic field of flux density 2 Wb m-2. It rotates from a position where its plane makes an angle of 30º with the field to a position perpendicular to the field in a time 0.2 sec. Find the magnitude of the emf induced in the coil due to its rotation.

Solution

N = 40 turns; B = 2 Wb m-2

A = 200 cm2 = 200 ´ 10-4 m2;


 

EXAMPLE 4.5

A straight conducting wire is dropped horizontally from a certain height with its length along east – west direction. Will an emf be induced in it? Justify your answer.

Solution

Yes! An emf will be induced in the wire because it moves perpendicular to the horizontal component of Earth’s magnetic field.

 

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12th Physics : Electromagnetic Induction and Alternating Current : Faraday’s Experiments on Electromagnetic Induction |


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