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Chapter: Human Neuroanatomy(Fundamental and Clinical): Introduction to Neuroanatomy

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Role of axoplasmic transport in spread of disease

Some infections that affect the nervous system travel along nerves.

Role of axoplasmic transport in spread of disease

      Some infections that affect the nervous system travel along nerves.

a                 Rabies is a disease (often fatal) caused by a bite of a rabid dog (and some other animals including monkeys). The saliva of an infected animal contains the rabies virus. The virus travels from the site of the bite to the central nervous system, along nerves, by reverse axoplasmic flow and causes infection there. As this means of transport is slow there is a delay of a few days between the bite and appearance of symptoms. The duration of this delay depends on the length of the nerve fibres concerned. A bite on the face produces symptoms much faster than one on the foot.

b                The virus of poliomyelitis is also transported (from the gastrointestinal tract) to the nervous system through reverse axoplasmic flow.

c                 In contrast tetanus travels from the site of infection to the brain through spaces in the endoneurium of nerve fibres.


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