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Chapter: Fundamentals of Database Systems - Query Processing and Optimization, and Database Tuning - Algorithms for Query Processing and Optimization

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Using Selectivity and Cost Estimates in Query Optimization

A query optimizer does not depend solely on heuristic rules; it also estimates and compares the costs of executing a query using different execution strategies and algorithms, and it then chooses the strategy with the lowest cost estimate.

Using Selectivity and Cost Estimates in Query Optimization

 

A query optimizer does not depend solely on heuristic rules; it also estimates and compares the costs of executing a query using different execution strategies and algorithms, and it then chooses the strategy with the lowest cost estimate. For this approach to work, accurate cost estimates are required so that different strategies can be compared fairly and realistically. In addition, the optimizer must limit the number of execution strategies to be considered; otherwise, too much time will be spent making cost estimates for the many possible execution strategies. Hence, this approach is more suitable for compiled queries where the optimization is done at compile time and the resulting execution strategy code is stored and executed directly at runtime. For interpreted queries, where the entire process shown in Figure 19.1 occurs at runtime, a full-scale optimization may slow down the response time. A more elaborate optimization is indicated for compiled queries, whereas a partial, less time-consuming optimization works best for interpreted queries.

 

This approach is generally referred to as cost-based query optimization. It uses traditional optimization techniques that search the solution space to a problem for a solution that minimizes an objective (cost) function. The cost functions used in query optimization are estimates and not exact cost functions, so the optimization may select a query execution strategy that is not the optimal (absolute best) one. In Section 19.8.1 we discuss the components of query execution cost. In Section 19.8.2 we discuss the type of information needed in cost functions. This information is kept in the DBMS catalog. In Section 19.8.3 we give examples of cost functions for the SELECT operation, and in Section 19.8.4 we discuss cost functions for two-way JOIN operations. Section 19.8.5 discusses multiway joins, and Section 19.8.6 gives an example.


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