Chapter: Java The Complete Reference - Introducing GUI Programming with Swing - Introducing Swing

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The MVC Connection - Swing

In general, a visual component is a composite of three distinct aspects:

The MVC Connection

 

In general, a visual component is a composite of three distinct aspects:

 

        The way that the component looks when rendered on the screen

 

        The way that the component reacts to the user

 

        The state information associated with the component

 

No matter what architecture is used to implement a component, it must implicitly contain these three parts. Over the years, one component architecture has proven itself to be exceptionally effective: Model-View-Controller, or MVC for short.

The MVC architecture is successful because each piece of the design corresponds to an aspect of a component. In MVC terminology, the model corresponds to the state information associated with the component. For example, in the case of a check box, the model contains a field that indicates if the box is checked or unchecked. The view determines how the component is displayed on the screen, including any aspects of the view that are affected by the current state of the model. The controller determines how the component reacts to the user. For example, when the user clicks a check box, the controller reacts by changing the model to reflect the user’s choice (checked or unchecked). This then results in the view being updated. By separating a component into a model, a view, and a controller, the specific implementation of each can be changed without affecting the other two. For instance, different view implementations can render the same component in different ways without affecting the model or the controller.

Although the MVC architecture and the principles behind it are conceptually sound, the high level of separation between the view and the controller is not beneficial for Swing components. Instead, Swing uses a modified version of MVC that combines the view and the controller into a single logical entity called the UI delegate. For this reason, Swing’s approach is called either the Model-Delegate architecture or the Separable Model architecture. Therefore, although Swing’s component architecture is based on MVC, it does not use a classical implementation of it.

 

Swing’s pluggable look and feel is made possible by its Model-Delegate architecture. Because the view (look) and controller (feel) are separate from the model, the look and feel can be changed without affecting how the component is used within a program.

Conversely, it is possible to customize the model without affecting the way that the component appears on the screen or responds to user input.

To support the Model-Delegate architecture, most Swing components contain two objects. The first represents the model. The second represents the UI delegate. Models are defined by interfaces. For example, the model for a button is defined by the ButtonModel interface. UI delegates are classes that inherit ComponentUI. For example, the UI delegate for a button is ButtonUI. Normally, your programs will not interact directly with the UI delegate.

 

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