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Chapter: Embedded and Real Time Systems - Introduction to Embedded Computing

CPU Performance

Now that we have an understanding of the various types of instructions that CPUs can execute, we can move on to a topic particularly important in embedded computing: How fast can the CPU execute instructions? In this section, we consider three factors that can substantially influence program performance: pipelining and caching.

CPU PERFORMANCE:

 

Now that we have an understanding of the various types of instructions that CPUs can execute, we can move on to a topic particularly important in embedded computing: How fast can the CPU execute instructions? In this section, we consider three factors that can substantially influence program performance: pipelining and caching.

 

1. Pipelining

 

Modern CPUs are designed as pipelined machines in which several instructions are executed in parallel. Pipelining greatly increases the efficiency of the CPU. But like any pipeline, a CPU pipeline works best when its contents flow smoothly.

 

Some sequences of instructions can disrupt the flow of information in the pipeline and, temporarily at least, slow down the operation of the CPU.

The ARM7 has a three-stage pipeline:

 

       Fetch the instruction is fetched from memory.

       Decode the instruction’s opcode and operands are decoded to determine what function to perform.

       Execute the decoded instruction is executed.

 

Each of these operations requires one clock cycle for typical instructions. Thus, a normal instruction requires three clock cycles to completely execute, known as the latency of instruction execution. But since the pipeline has three stages, an instruction is completed in every clock cycle. In other words, the pipeline has a throughput of one instruction per cycle.

 

Figure 1.22 illustrates the position of instructions in the pipeline during execution using the notation introduced by Hennessy and Patterson [Hen06]. A vertical slice through the timeline shows all instructions in the pipeline at that time. By following an instruction horizontally, we can see the progress of its execution.

 

The C55x includes a seven-stage pipeline [Tex00B]:

 

        Fetch.

        Decode.

        Address computes data and branch addresses.

        Access 1 reads data.

        Access 2 finishes data read.

        Read stage puts operands onto internal busses.

        Execute performs operations.

 

RISC machines are designed to keep the pipeline busy. CISC machines may display a wide variation in instruction timing. Pipelined RISC machines typically have more regular timing characteristics most instructions that do not have pipeline hazards display the same latency.


 

2. Caching

 

We have already discussed caches functionally. Although caches are invisible in the programming model, they have a profound effect on performance. We introduce caches because they substantially reduce memory access time when the requested location is in the cache.

 

 

However, the desired location is not always in the cache since it is considerably smaller than main memory. As a result, caches cause the time required to access memory to vary considerably. The extra time required to access a memory location not in the cache is often called the cache miss penalty.

 

The amount of variation depends on several factors in the system architecture, but a cache miss is often several clock cycles slower than a cache hit. The time required to access a memory location depends on whether the

 

requested location is in the cache. However, as we have seen, a location may not be in the cache for several reasons.

 

       At a compulsory miss, the location has not been referenced before.

 

       At a conflict miss, two particular memory locations are fighting for the same cache line.

 

       At a capacity miss, the program’s working set is simply too large for the cache.

 

The contents of the cache can change considerably over the course of execution of a program. When we have several programs running concurrently on the CPU,


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