Chapter: Multicore Application Programming For Windows, Linux, and Oracle Solaris - Hardware, Processes, and Threads

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Translating from Virtual Addresses to Physical Addresses

The critical step in using virtual memory is the translation of a virtual address, as used by an application, into a physical address, as used by the processor, to fetch the data from memory.

Translating from Virtual Addresses to Physical Addresses

 

The critical step in using virtual memory is the translation of a virtual address, as used by an application, into a physical address, as used by the processor, to fetch the data from memory. This step is achieved using a part of the processor called the translation look-aside buffer (TLB). Typically, there will be one TLB for translating the address of instructions (the instruction TLB or ITLB) and a second TLB for translating the address of data (the data TLB, or DTLB).

 

Each TLB is a list of the virtual address range and corresponding physical address range of each page in memory. So when a processor needs to translate a virtual address to a physical address, it first splits the address into a virtual page (the high-order bits) and an offset from the start of that page (the low-order bits). It then looks up the address of this virtual page in the list of translations held in the TLB. It gets the physical address of the page and adds the offset to this to get the address of the data in physical memory. It can then use this to fetch the data. Figure 1.17 shows this process.

 

Unfortunately, a TLB can hold only a limited set of translations. So, sometimes a processor will need to find a physical address, but the translation does not reside in the TLB. In these cases, the translation is fetched from an in-memory data structure called a page table, and this structure can hold many more virtual to physical mappings. When a translation does not reside in the TLB, it is referred to as a TLB miss, and TLB misses have an impact on performance. The magnitude of the performance impact depends on whether the hardware fetches the TLB entry from the page table or whether this task is managed by software; most current processors handle this in hardware. It is also possible to have a page table miss, although this event is very rare for most applications. The page table is managed by software, so this typically is an expensive or slow event.


TLBs share many characteristics with caches; consequently, they also share some of the same problems. TLBs can experience both capacity misses and conflict misses. A capacity miss is where the amount of memory being mapped by the application is greater than the amount of memory that can be mapped by the TLB. Conflict misses are the situation where multiple pages in memory map into the same TLB entry; adding a new mapping causes the old mapping to be evicted from the TLB. The miss rate for TLBs can be reduced using the same techniques as caches do. However, for TLBs, there is one further characteristic that can be changed—the size of the page that is mapped.

 

On SPARC architectures, the default page size is 8KB; on x86, it is 4KB. Each TLB entry provides a mapping for this range of physical or virtual memory. Modern proces-sors can handle multiple page sizes, so a single TLB entry might be able to provide a mapping for a page that is 64KB, 256KB, megabytes, or even gigabytes in size. The obvi-ous benefit to larger page sizes is that fewer TLB entries are needed to map the virtual address space that an application uses. Using fewer TLB entries means less chance of them being knocked out of the TLB when a new entry is loaded. This results in a lower TLB miss rate. For example, mapping a 1GB address space with 4MB pages requires 256 entries, whereas mapping the same memory with 8KB pages would require 131,072. It might be possible for 256 entries to fit into a TLB, but 131,072 would not.

The following are some disadvantages to using larger page sizes:

 

n   Allocation of a large page requires a contiguous block of physical memory to allo-cate the page. If there is not sufficient contiguous memory, then it is not possible to allocate the large page. This problem introduces challenges for the operating sys-tem in handling and making large pages available. If it is not possible to provide a large page to an application, the operating system has the option of either moving other allocated physical memory around or providing the application with multi-ple smaller pages.

 

An application that uses large pages will reserve that much physical memory even if the application does not require the memory. This can lead to memory being used inefficiently. Even a small application may end up reserving large amounts of physical memory.

 

n   A problem particular to multiprocessor systems is that pages in memory will often have a lower access latency from one processor than another. The larger the page size, the more likely it is that the page will be shared between threads running on different processors. The threads running on the processor with the higher mem-ory latency may run slower. This issue will be discussed in more detail in the next section, “The Characteristics of Multiprocessor Systems.”

 

For most applications, using large page sizes will lead to a performance improvement, although there will be instances where other factors will outweigh these benefits.


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