Chapter: Fundamentals of Database Systems - File Structures, Indexing, and Hashing - Disk Storage, Basic File Structures, and Hashing

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Operations on Files

Operations on files are usually grouped into retrieval operations and update operations.

Operations on Files

 

Operations on files are usually grouped into retrieval operations and update operations. The former do not change any data in the file, but only locate certain records so that their field values can be examined and processed. The latter change the file by insertion or deletion of records or by modification of field values. In either case, we may have to select one or more records for retrieval, deletion, or modification based on a selection condition (or filtering condition), which specifies criteria that the desired record or records must satisfy.

 

Consider an EMPLOYEE file with fields Name, Ssn, Salary, Job_code, and Department. A simple selection condition may involve an equality comparison on some field value—for example, (Ssn = ‘123456789’) or (Department = ‘Research’). More com-plex conditions can involve other types of comparison operators, such as > or ; an example is (Salary 30000). The general case is to have an arbitrary Boolean expres-sion on the fields of the file as the selection condition.

 

Search operations on files are generally based on simple selection conditions. A complex condition must be decomposed by the DBMS (or the programmer) to extract a simple condition that can be used to locate the records on disk. Each located record is then checked to determine whether it satisfies the full selection condition. For example, we may extract the simple condition (Department = ‘Research’) from the complex condition ((Salary 30000) AND (Department = ‘Research’)); each record satisfying (Department = ‘Research’) is located and then tested to see if it also satisfies (Salary 30000).

 

When several file records satisfy a search condition, the first record—with respect to the physical sequence of file records—is initially located and designated the current record. Subsequent search operations commence from this record and locate the next record in the file that satisfies the condition.

 

Actual operations for locating and accessing file records vary from system to system. Below, we present a set of representative operations. Typically, high-level programs, such as DBMS software programs, access records by using these commands, so we sometimes refer to program variables in the following descriptions:

 

        Open. Prepares the file for reading or writing. Allocates appropriate buffers (typically at least two) to hold file blocks from disk, and retrieves the file header. Sets the file pointer to the beginning of the file.

 

        Reset. Sets the file pointer of an open file to the beginning of the file.

 

Find (or Locate). Searches for the first record that satisfies a search condition. Transfers the block containing that record into a main memory buffer (if it is not already there). The file pointer points to the record in the buffer and it becomes the current record. Sometimes, different verbs are used to indicate whether the located record is to be retrieved or updated.

 

        Read (or Get). Copies the current record from the buffer to a program variable in the user program. This command may also advance the current record pointer to the next record in the file, which may necessitate reading the next file block from disk.

 

        FindNext. Searches for the next record in the file that satisfies the search condition. Transfers the block containing that record into a main memory buffer (if it is not already there). The record is located in the buffer and becomes the current record. Various forms of FindNext (for example, Find Next record within a current parent record, Find Next record of a given type, or Find Next record where a complex condition is met) are available in legacy DBMSs based on the hierarchical and network models.

 

        Delete. Deletes the current record and (eventually) updates the file on disk to reflect the deletion.

 

        Modify. Modifies some field values for the current record and (eventually) updates the file on disk to reflect the modification.

 

        Insert. Inserts a new record in the file by locating the block where the record is to be inserted, transferring that block into a main memory buffer (if it is not already there), writing the record into the buffer, and (eventually) writ-ing the buffer to disk to reflect the insertion.

 

        Close. Completes the file access by releasing the buffers and performing any other needed cleanup operations.

 

The preceding (except for Open and Close) are called record-at-a-time operations because each operation applies to a single record. It is possible to streamline the operations Find, FindNext, and Read into a single operation, Scan, whose description is as follows:

 

        Scan. If the file has just been opened or reset, Scan returns the first record; otherwise it returns the next record. If a condition is specified with the oper-ation, the returned record is the first or next record satisfying the condition.

 

In database systems, additional set-at-a-time higher-level operations may be applied to a file. Examples of these are as follows:

 

        FindAll. Locates all the records in the file that satisfy a search condition.

 

        Find (or Locate) n. Searches for the first record that satisfies a search condition and then continues to locate the next n – 1 records satisfying the same condition. Transfers the blocks containing the n records to the main memory buffer (if not already there).

 

        FindOrdered. Retrieves all the records in the file in some specified order.

 

Reorganize. Starts the reorganization process. As we shall see, some file organizations require periodic reorganization. An example is to reorder the file records by sorting them on a specified field.

At this point, it is worthwhile to note the difference between the terms file organization and access method. A file organization refers to the organization of the data of a file into records, blocks, and access structures; this includes the way records and blocks are placed on the storage medium and interlinked. An access method, on the other hand, provides a group of operations—such as those listed earlier—that can be applied to a file. In general, it is possible to apply several access methods to a file organization. Some access methods, though, can be applied only to files organized in certain ways. For example, we cannot apply an indexed access method to a file without an index (see Chapter 18).

 

Usually, we expect to use some search conditions more than others. Some files may be static, meaning that update operations are rarely performed; other, more dynamic files may change frequently, so update operations are constantly applied to them. A successful file organization should perform as efficiently as possible the operations we expect to apply frequently to the file. For example, consider the EMPLOYEE file, as shown in Figure 17.5(a), which stores the records for current employees in a company. We expect to insert records (when employees are hired), delete records (when employees leave the company), and modify records (for exam-ple, when an employee’s salary or job is changed). Deleting or modifying a record requires a selection condition to identify a particular record or set of records. Retrieving one or more records also requires a selection condition.

 

If users expect mainly to apply a search condition based on Ssn, the designer must choose a file organization that facilitates locating a record given its Ssn value. This may involve physically ordering the records by Ssn value or defining an index on Ssn (see Chapter 18). Suppose that a second application uses the file to generate employees’ paychecks and requires that paychecks are grouped by department. For this application, it is best to order employee records by department and then by name within each department. The clustering of records into blocks and the organ-ization of blocks on cylinders would now be different than before. However, this arrangement conflicts with ordering the records by Ssn values. If both applications are important, the designer should choose an organization that allows both operations to be done efficiently. Unfortunately, in many cases a single organization does not allow all needed operations on a file to be implemented efficiently. This requires that a compromise must be chosen that takes into account the expected importance and mix of retrieval and update operations.

 

In the following sections and in Chapter 18, we discuss methods for organizing records of a file on disk. Several general techniques, such as ordering, hashing, and indexing, are used to create access methods. Additionally, various general techniques for handling insertions and deletions work with many file organizations.

 

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