Chapter: Java The Complete Reference - The Java Library - Exploring java.lang

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Interface - java.lang

The CharSequence interface defines methods that grant read-only access to a sequence of characters. These methods are shown in Table 17-23. This interface is implemented by String, StringBuffer, and StringBuilder, among others.

The CharSequence Interface

 

The CharSequence interface defines methods that grant read-only access to a sequence of characters. These methods are shown in Table 17-23. This interface is implemented by String, StringBuffer, and StringBuilder, among others.

 

The Comparable Interface

 

Objects of classes that implement Comparable can be ordered. In other words, classes that implement Comparable contain objects that can be compared in some meaningful manner. Comparable is generic and is declared like this:

 

interface Comparable<T>

 

Here, T represents the type of objects being compared.


Method : Description

char charAt(int idx) : Returns the character at the index specified by idx.

default IntStream chars( ) : Returns a stream (in the form of an IntStream) to the characters in the invoking object. (Added by JDK 8.)

default IntStream codePoints( ) : Returns a stream (in the form of an IntStream) to the code points in the invoking object. (Added by JDK 8.)

int length( ) : Returns the number of characters in the invoking sequence.

CharSequence subSequence(int startIdx, int stopIdx) : Returns a subset of the invoking sequence beginning at startIdx and ending at stopIdx–1.

String toString( ) : Returns the String equivalent of the invoking sequence.

Table 17-23   The Methods Defined by CharSequence

The Comparable interface declares one method that is used to determine what Java calls the natural ordering of instances of a class. The signature of the method is shown here:

 

int compareTo(T obj)

 

This method compares the invoking object with obj. It returns 0 if the values are equal. A negative value is returned if the invoking object has a lower value. Otherwise, a positive value is returned.

This interface is implemented by several of the classes already reviewed in this book. Specifically, the Byte, Character, Double, Float, Long, Short, String, and Integer classes define a compareTo( ) method. So does Enum.

 

The Appendable Interface

 

Objects of a class that implements Appendable can have a character or character sequences appended to it. Appendable defines these three methods:

 

Appendable append(char ch) throws IOException Appendable append(CharSequence chars) throws IOException

Appendable append(CharSequence chars, int begin, int end) throws IOException

 

In the first form, the character ch is appended to the invoking object. In the second form, the character sequence chars is appended to the invoking object. The third form allows you to indicate a portion (the characters running from begin through end–1) of the sequence specified by chars. In all cases, a reference to the invoking object is returned.

 

The Iterable Interface

 

Iterable must be implemented by any class whose objects will be used by the for-each version of the for loop. In other words, in order for an object to be used within a for-each style for loop, its class must implement Iterable. Iterable is a generic interface that has this declaration:

 

interface Iterable<T>

 

Here, T is the type of the object being iterated. It defines one abstract method, iterator( ), which is shown here:

 

Iterator<T> iterator( )

 

It returns an iterator to the elements contained in the invoking object.

 

Beginning with JDK 8, Iterable also defines two default methods. The first is called forEach( ):

 

default void forEach(Consumer<? super T> action)

 

For each element being iterated, forEach( ) executes the code specified by action. (Consumer is a functional interface added by JDK 8 and defined in java.util.function. See Chapter 19.)

The second default method is spliterator( ), shown next: default Spliterator<T> spliterator( )

It returns a Spliterator to the sequence being iterated. (See Chapters 18 and 29 for details on spliterators.)

The Readable Interface

 

The Readable interface indicates that an object can be used as a source for characters. It defines one method called read( ), which is shown here:

 

int read(CharBuffer buf ) throws IOException

 

This method reads characters into buf. It returns the number of characters read, or –1 if an EOF is encountered.

 

The AutoCloseable Interface

 

AutoCloseable provides support for the try-with-resources statement, which implements what is sometimes referred to as automatic resource management (ARM). The try-with-resources statement automates the process of releasing a resource (such as a stream) when it is no longer needed. (See Chapter 13 for details.) Only objects of classes that implement AutoCloseable can be used with try-with-resources. The AutoCloseable interface defines only the close( ) method, which is shown here:

 

void close( ) throws Exception

 

This method closes the invoking object, releasing any resources that it may hold. It is automatically called at the end of a try-with-resources statement, thus eliminating the need to explicitly invoke close( ). AutoCloseable is implemented by several classes, including all of the I/O classes that open a stream that can be closed.

 

The Thread.UncaughtExceptionHandler Interface

 

The static Thread.UncaughtExceptionHandler interface is implemented by classes that want to handle uncaught exceptions. It is implemented by ThreadGroup. It declares only one method, which is shown here:

 

void uncaughtException(Thread thrd, Throwable exc)

 

Here, thrd is a reference to the thread that generated the exception and exc is a reference to the exception.

 

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