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Civil - Remote Sensing Techniques and GIS - EMR and Its Interaction With Atmosphere and Earth Material

Remote Sensing And Its Components

   Posted On :  09.08.2016 07:32 pm
Remote Sensing And Its Components

Remote sensing is the science of acquiring information about the Earth's surface without actually bein g in contact with it.

REMOTE SENSING AND ITS COMPONENTS:

 

Remote sensing is the science of acquiring information about the Earth's surface without actually bein g in contact with it. This is done by sen sing and recording reflected or emitted energy and processing, analyzing, and applying th at information." In much  of  remote  sensing, the  process  involves  an  interaction betee n  incident adiation and the targets of interest. T his is exemplified by the use of imaging systems where the following seven elements are involved. However that remote sensg also involves the sensing of emitted energy and the use of non-imaging sensors.

1. Energy Source or Illumination (A) - the first requirement for remote sensing is to  have an energy source which illuminates or  provides  electromagnetic energy to the target of interest.

 

2. Radiation  and the Atmosphre (B) - as the energy travels  from  its source to  the target, it will come in   contact with   and interact with the atmosphere it passes through. This interaction may take place a second time as the energy travels from the target to the sensor.

 

3. Interaction with the Target (C) - once the energy makes its way to the target through the atmosphere, it interacts with the target depending on the properties of both the target and the radiation.

 

4. Recording of Energy by the Sensor (D) - after the energy has been scattered by, or emitted from the target, we require a sensor (remote - not in contact with the target) to collect and record the electromagnetic radiation.

 

5. Transmission, Reception, and Processing (E) - the energy recorded by the sensor has to be transmitted, often in electronic form, to a receiving and processing station where the data are processed into an image (hardcopy and/or digital).

 

6. Interpretation and Analysis (F) - the processed image is interpreted, visually and/or digitally or electronically, to extract information about the target which was illuminated.

 

7. Application (G) - the final element of the remote sensing process is achieved when we apply the information we have been able to extract from the imagery about the target in order to better understand it, reveal some new information, or assist in solving a particular problem.

 

HISTRY OF REMOTE SENSING:

 

1839 - first photograph

1858 - first photo from a balloon

1903 - first plane

 1909 first photo from a plane 1903-4 -B/W infrared film

WW I and WW II 1960 - space

 

 

Tags : Civil - Remote Sensing Techniques and GIS - EMR and Its Interaction With Atmosphere and Earth Material
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