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Chapter: Pharmaceutical Biotechnology: Fundamentals and Applications - Hematopoietic Growth Factors

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Chemical Properties and Marketing Information for the Myeloid Factors, G-CSF and GM-CSF

The chemical properties of the myeloid HGFs, G-CSF and GM-CSF, have been characterized.

Chemical Properties and Marketing Information for the Myeloid Factors, G-CSF and GM-CSF

 

The chemical properties of the myeloid HGFs, G-CSF and GM-CSF, have been characterized (Table 2). The gene that encodes for G-CSF is located on chromo-some 17 and the mature G-CSF polypeptide has 174 amino acids. The gene that encodes for GM-CSF is located on chromosome 4 and the mature polypeptide has 127 or 128 amino acids. Filgrastim, a rhG-CSF, is marketed by several companies under several trade names throughout the world. Lenograstim, another rhG-CSF, is not marketed in the United States but is marketed in other countries under several trade


names. Molgramostim and sargramostim are two versions of rhGM-CSF; the former is marketed in Europe and the latter, in the United States, under several trade names. For a review of rhG-CSF, see Welte et al. (1996); for a review of rhGM-CSF, see Armitage (1998).

Pegfilgrastim, a long-acting form of filgrastim, is marketed as Neulasta in Australia, Canada, the European Union, Switzerland, and the United States. For a review of pegfilgratim, see Molineux (2004).


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