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Chapter: Mechanical - Automobile Engineering - Engine Auxiliary Systems Ignition System

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Carburetion

Spark-ignition engines normally use volatile liquid fuels. Preparation of fuel-air mixture is done outside the engine cylinder and formation of a homogeneous mixture is normally not completed in the inlet manifold.


Carburetion

 

Spark-ignition engines normally use volatile liquid fuels. Preparation of fuel-air mixture is done outside the engine cylinder and formation of a homogeneous mixture is normally not completed in the inlet manifold. Fuel droplets, which remain in suspension, continue to evaporate and mix with air even during suction and compression processes. The process of mixture preparation is extremely important for spark-ignition engines. The purpose of carburetion is to provide a combustible mixture of fuel and air in the required quantity and quality for efficient operation of the engine under all conditions.

 

Definition of Carburetion;

 

The process of formation of a combustible fuel-air mixture by mixing the proper amount of fuel with air before admission to engine cylinder is called carburetion and the device which does this job is called a carburetor.

 

Definition of Carburetor;

 

The carburetor is a device used for atomizing and vaporizing the fuel and mixing it with the air in varying proportions to suit the changing operating conditions of vehicle engines.

 

 

Factors Affecting Carburetion

 

Of the various factors, the process of carburetion is influenced by

i. The engine speed

ii. The vaporization characteristics of the fuel

iii. The temperature of the incoming air and

iv. The design of the carburetor

 

Principle of Carburetion

 

Both air and gasoline are drawn through the carburetor and into the engine cylinders by the suction created by the downward movement of the piston. This suction is due to an increase in the volume of the cylinder and a consequent decrease in the gas pressure in this chamber.

 

It is the difference in pressure between the atmosphere and cylinder that causes the air to flow into the chamber. In the carburetor, air passing into the combustion chamber picks up discharged from a tube. This tube has a fine orifice called carburetor jet that is exposed to the air path.

 

The rate at which fuel is discharged into the air depends on the pressure difference or pressure head between the float chamber and the throat of the venturi and on the area of the outlet of the tube. In order that the fuel drawn from the nozzle may be thoroughly atomized, the suction effect must be strong and the nozzle outlet comparatively small. In order to produce a strong suction, the pipe in the carburetor carrying air to the engine is made to have a restriction. At this restriction called throat due to increase in velocity of flow, a suction effect is created. The restriction is made in the form of a venturi to minimize throttling losses.

 

The end of the fuel jet is located at the venturi or throat of the carburetor. The geometry of venturi tube is as shown in Fig.16.6. It has a narrower path at the center so that the flow area through which the air must pass is considerably reduced. As the same amount of air must pass through every point in the tube, its velocity will be greatest at the narrowest point. The smaller the area, the greater will be the velocity of the air, and thereby the suction is proportionately increased

 

As mentioned earlier, the opening of the fuel discharge jet is usually loped where the suction is maximum. Normally, this is just below the narrowest section of the venturi tube. The spray of gasoline from the nozzle and the air entering through the venturi tube are mixed together in this region and a combustible mixture is formed which passes through the intake manifold into the cylinders. Most of the fuel gets atomized and simultaneously a small part will be vaporized. Increased air velocity at the throat of the venturi helps he rate of evaporation of fuel. The difficulty of obtaining a mixture of sufficiently high fuel vapour-air ratio for efficient starting of the engine and for uniform fuel-air ratio indifferent cylinders (in case of multi cylinder engine) cannot be fully met by the increased air velocity alone at the venturi throat.

 

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