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Chapter: Introduction to Botany: The Origin of Trees and Seeds

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Branching Shoot

Branching Shoot
Branching in seed plants is based on the axial buds. These buds are located in axils of leaves and develop into secondary shoots.

Branching Shoot

 

Branching in seed plants is based on the axial buds. These buds are located in axils of leaves and develop into secondary shoots. There are two main types of branching: monopodial and sympodial (Fig. 7.5). Monopodial branching is when the buds do not degrade and all the shoots continue to grow. Sym-podial branching is when the terminal buds do degrade (make FU and/or dieout) and the lateral shoot closest to the terminal bud now becomes the termi-nal shoot and continues the vertical growth. This happens because the terminal SAM suppresses the downstream meristems by producing the auxin hormone (apical dominance). Apical dominance is a basis of multiple gardening trimming techniques.

 

Monopodial branching creates the conical (spruce-like) crown whereas sympo-dial branching will create crowns of many different shapes. Monopodial growth is considered to be more primitive. Some monopodial trees may even die if the terminal bud is damaged. An even more ancestral mode of branching is dichoto-mous, when every branch splits into two; this is frequent in lycopods and someother Pteridophyta. 



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