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Chapter: Mechanical - Gas Dynamics and Jet Propulsion - Jet Propulsion

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The Turbojet Engine

The Turbojet Engine
The turbojet engine consists of diffuser which shows down the entrance air and thereby compresses it, a slows down the entrance air and thereby compresses it, a simple open cycle gas turbine and an exist gas into kinetic energy.

The Turbojet Engine

 

The turbojet engine consists of diffuser which shows down the entrance air and thereby compresses it, a slows down the entrance air and thereby compresses it, a simple open cycle gas turbine and an exist gas into kinetic energy. The increased velocity, of air thereby produces thrust.

 

Figure 2 shows the basic arrangement of the diffuser, compressor, combustion chamber, turbine and the exhaust nozzle of a turbojet engine. Of the total pressure rise of air, a part is obtained by the rain compression in the diffuser and rest in the compressor. The diffuser converts kinetic energy of the air into pressure energy. In the ideal diffuser, the air is diffused isentopically down to zero velocity. In the actual diffuser the process is irreversible adiabatic and the air leaves the diffuser at a velocity between 60 and 120 m/s


The centrifugal compressor gives a pressure ratio of about 4:1 to 5:1 in a single stage and usually a double-sided rotor is used. The turbojet using centrifugal compressor has a short and sturdy appearance. The advantages of centrifugal compressor are high durability, ease of manufacture and low cost and good operation under adverse conditions such as icing and when sand and small foreign particles are inhaled in the inlet duct. The primary disadvantage is the lack of straight-through airflow. Air leaves compressor in radial direction and ducting with the attendant pressure losses is necessary to change the direction. The axial flow is more efficient than the centrifugal type and gives the turbojet a long slim, streamlined appearance. The engine diameter is reduced which results in low aircraft drag. A multistage axial flow compressor can develop a pressure ratio as high as 6:1 or more. The air handled by it is more than that handled by a centrifugal compressor of the same diameter.

A variation of the axial compressor, the twin-spool (dual spool, split spool or coaxial) compressor has two or more sections, each revolving at or near the optimum speed for its pressure ratio and volume of air. A very high-pressure ratio of about 9:1 to 13:1 is obtained. The use of high-pressure ratio gives very good specific fuel consumption and is necessary for thrust ratings in the region of 50000 N or greater.

 

In the combustion chamber heat is added to the compressed air nearly at constant pressure. The three types being ‘can’, ‘annular’ and ‘can-annular’ (ref.fig.3). In the can type individual burners, or cans, are mounted in a circle around the engine axis with each one receiving air through its own cylindrical shroud. One of the main disadvantages of can type burners is that they do not make the best use of available space and this results in a large diameter engine. On the other hand, the burners are individually removable for inspection and air-fuel patterns are easier to control than in annular designs. The annular burner is essentially a single chamber made of concentric cylinders mounted co-axially about the engine axis. This arrangement makes more complete use of available space, has low pressure loss, fits well with the axial compressor and turbine and form a technical viewpoint has the highest efficiency, but has a disadvantage in that structural problems may arise due to the large diameter, thin-wall cylinder required with this type of chamber. The problem is more severe for larger engines. There is also some disadvantage in that the entire combustor must be removable from the engine for inspection and repairs. The can- annular design also makes good use of available space, but employs a number of individually replaceable cylindrical inner liners that receive air through a common annular housing for good control of fuel and air flow patterns. The can-annular arrangement has the added advantage of greater structural stability and lower pressure loss than that of the can type.


The heated air then expands through the turbine thereby increasing its velocity while losing pressure. The turbine extracts enough energy to drive the compressor and the necessary auxiliary equipments. Turbines of the impulse, reaction and a combination of both types are used. In general, it may be stated that those engines of relatively low thrust and simple design employ the impulse type, while those of large thrust employ the reaction and combination types.

The hot gas is then expended through the exit nozzle and the energy of the hot gas is converted into as much kinetic energy as is possible. This change in velocity of the air passing through the engine multiplied by the mass flow of the air is the change of momentum, which produces thrust. The nozzle can be a fixed jet or a variable area nozzle. The variable area nozzle permits the turbojet to operate at maximum efficiency over a wide range of power output. Clamshell, Finger or Iris, Centre plug with movable shroud, annular ring, annular ring with movable shroud are the various types of variable area nozzle for turbojet engines. The advantage of variable area nozzle is the increased cost, weight and complexity of the exhaust system.

 

The needs and demands being fulfilled by the turbojet engine are

 

Ø     Low specific weight – ¼ to ½ of the reciprocating engine

 

Ø     Relative simplicity – no unbalanced forces or reciprocating engine

 

Ø     Small frontal area, reduced air cooling problem- less than ¼ th the frontal area of the

 

reciprocating engine giving a large decrease in nacelle drag and consequently giving a greater available excess thrust or power, particularly at high speeds.

Ø     Not restricted in power output - engines can be built with greatly increased power output over that of the reciprocating engine without the accompanying disadvantages.

 

Ø     Higher speeds can be obtained – not restricted by a propeller to speeds below 800 km/h.

 

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