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Chapter: Fundamentals of Database Systems - The Relational Data Model and SQL - The Relational Data Model and Relational Database Constraints

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Update Operations, Transactions, and Dealing with Constraint Violations

1. The Insert Operation 2. The Delete Operation 3. The Update Operation 4. The Transaction Concept

Update Operations, Transactions, and Dealing with Constraint Violations

 

The operations of the relational model can be categorized into retrievals and updates. The relational algebra operations, which can be used to specify retrievals, are discussed in detail in Chapter 6. A relational algebra expression forms a new relation after applying a number of algebraic operators to an existing set of relations; its main use is for querying a database to retrieve information. The user formulates a query that specifies the data of interest, and a new relation is formed by applying relational operators to retrieve this data. That result relation becomes the answer to (or result of) the user’s query. Chapter 6 also introduces the language called relational calculus, which is used to define the new relation declaratively without giving a specific order of operations.

 

In this section, we concentrate on the database modification or update operations. There are three basic operations that can change the states of relations in the data-base: Insert, Delete, and Update (or Modify). They insert new data, delete old data, or modify existing data records. Insert is used to insert one or more new tuples in a relation, Delete is used to delete tuples, and Update (or Modify) is used to change the values of some attributes in existing tuples. Whenever these operations are applied, the integrity constraints specified on the relational database schema should not be violated. In this section we discuss the types of constraints that may be violated by each of these operations and the types of actions that may be taken if an operation causes a violation. We use the database shown in Figure 3.6 for examples and discuss only key constraints, entity integrity constraints, and the referential integrity constraints shown in Figure 3.7. For each type of operation, we give some examples and discuss any constraints that each operation may violate.

 

1. The Insert Operation

 

The Insert operation provides a list of attribute values for a new tuple t that is to be inserted into a relation R. Insert can violate any of the four types of constraints dis-cussed in the previous section. Domain constraints can be violated if an attribute value is given that does not appear in the corresponding domain or is not of the appropriate data type. Key constraints can be violated if a key value in the new tuple t already exists in another tuple in the relation r(R). Entity integrity can be violated if any part of the primary key of the new tuple t is NULL. Referential integrity can be violated if the value of any foreign key in t refers to a tuple that does not exist in the referenced relation. Here are some examples to illustrate this discussion.

 

                                                    Operation:

 

Insert <‘Cecilia’, ‘F’, ‘Kolonsky’, NULL, ‘1960-04-05’, ‘6357 Windy Lane, Katy, TX’, F, 28000, NULL, 4> into EMPLOYEE.

 

Result: This insertion violates the entity integrity constraint (NULL for the primary key Ssn), so it is rejected.

 

                                                    Operation:

 

Insert <‘Alicia’, ‘J’, ‘Zelaya’, ‘999887777’, ‘1960-04-05’, ‘6357 Windy Lane, Katy, TX’, F, 28000, ‘987654321’, 4> into EMPLOYEE.

 

Result: This insertion violates the key constraint because another tuple with the same Ssn value already exists in the EMPLOYEE relation, and so it is rejected.

 

                                                    Operation:

 

Insert <‘Cecilia’, ‘F’, ‘Kolonsky’, ‘677678989’, ‘1960-04-05’, ‘6357 Windswept, Katy, TX’, F, 28000, ‘987654321’, 7> into EMPLOYEE.

 

Result: This insertion violates the referential integrity constraint specified on Dno in EMPLOYEE because no corresponding referenced tuple exists in

 

DEPARTMENT with Dnumber = 7.

              Operation:

 

Insert <‘Cecilia’, ‘F’, ‘Kolonsky’, ‘677678989’, ‘1960-04-05’, ‘6357 Windy Lane, Katy, TX’, F, 28000, NULL, 4> into EMPLOYEE.

Result: This insertion satisfies all constraints, so it is acceptable.

 

If an insertion violates one or more constraints, the default option is to reject the insertion. In this case, it would be useful if the DBMS could provide a reason to the user as to why the insertion was rejected. Another option is to attempt to correct the reason for rejecting the insertion, but this is typically not used for violations caused by Insert; rather, it is used more often in correcting violations for Delete and Update. In the first operation, the DBMS could ask the user to provide a value for Ssn, and could then accept the insertion if a valid Ssn value is provided. In opera-tion 3, the DBMS could either ask the user to change the value of Dno to some valid value (or set it to NULL), or it could ask the user to insert a DEPARTMENT tuple with Dnumber = 7 and could accept the original insertion only after such an operation was accepted. Notice that in the latter case the insertion violation can cascade back to the EMPLOYEE relation if the user attempts to insert a tuple for department 7 with a value for Mgr_ssn that does not exist in the EMPLOYEE relation.

 

2. The Delete Operation

 

The Delete operation can violate only referential integrity. This occurs if the tuple being deleted is referenced by foreign keys from other tuples in the database. To specify deletion, a condition on the attributes of the relation selects the tuple (or tuples) to be deleted. Here are some examples.

 

              Operation:

 

Delete the WORKS_ON tuple with Essn = ‘999887777’ and Pno = 10. Result: This deletion is acceptable and deletes exactly one tuple.

 

              Operation:

Delete the EMPLOYEE tuple with Ssn = ‘999887777’.

 

Result: This deletion is not acceptable, because there are tuples in WORKS_ON that refer to this tuple. Hence, if the tuple in EMPLOYEE is

deleted, referential integrity violations will result.

 

              Operation:

Delete the EMPLOYEE tuple with Ssn = ‘333445555’.

 

Result: This deletion will result in even worse referential integrity violations, because the tuple involved is referenced by tuples from the EMPLOYEE,

DEPARTMENT, WORKS_ON, and DEPENDENT relations.

 

Several options are available if a deletion operation causes a violation. The first option, called restrict, is to reject the deletion. The second option, called cascade, is to attempt to cascade (or propagate) the deletion by deleting tuples that reference the tuple that is being deleted. For example, in operation 2, the DBMS could automati-cally delete the offending tuples from WORKS_ON with Essn = ‘999887777’. A third option, called set null or set default, is to modify the referencing attribute values that cause the violation; each such value is either set to NULL or changed to reference another default valid tuple. Notice that if a referencing attribute that causes a viola-tion is part of the primary key, it cannot be set to NULL; otherwise, it would violate entity integrity.

 

Combinations of these three options are also possible. For example, to avoid having operation 3 cause a violation, the DBMS may automatically delete all tuples from WORKS_ON and DEPENDENT with Essn = ‘333445555’. Tuples in EMPLOYEE with Super_ssn = ‘333445555’ and the tuple in DEPARTMENT with Mgr_ssn = ‘333445555’ can have their Super_ssn and Mgr_ssn values changed to other valid values or to NULL. Although it may make sense to delete automatically the WORKS_ON and DEPENDENT tuples that refer to an EMPLOYEE tuple, it may not make sense to delete other EMPLOYEE tuples or a DEPARTMENT tuple.

 

In general, when a referential integrity constraint is specified in the DDL, the DBMS will allow the database designer to specify which of the options applies in case of a violation of the constraint. We discuss how to specify these options in the SQL DDL in Chapter 4.

 

3. The Update Operation

 

The Update (or Modify) operation is used to change the values of one or more attributes in a tuple (or tuples) of some relation R. It is necessary to specify a condition on the attributes of the relation to select the tuple (or tuples) to be modified. Here are some examples.

 

                                                    Operation:

 

Update the salary of the EMPLOYEE tuple with Ssn = ‘999887777’ to 28000. Result: Acceptable.

 

                                                    Operation:

 

Update the Dno of the EMPLOYEE tuple with Ssn = ‘999887777’ to 1. Result: Acceptable.

 

                                                    Operation:

 

Update the Dno of the EMPLOYEE tuple with Ssn = ‘999887777’ to 7. Result: Unacceptable, because it violates referential integrity.

 

                                                    Operation:

 

Update the Ssn of the EMPLOYEE tuple with Ssn = ‘999887777’ to ‘987654321’.

 

Result: Unacceptable, because it violates primary key constraint by repeating a value that already exists as a primary key in another tuple; it violates refer-ential integrity constraints because there are other relations that refer to the existing value of Ssn.

 

Updating an attribute that is neither part of a primary key nor of a foreign key usually causes no problems; the DBMS need only check to confirm that the new value is of the correct data type and domain. Modifying a primary key value is similar to delet-ing one tuple and inserting another in its place because we use the primary key to identify tuples. Hence, the issues discussed earlier in both Sections 3.3.1 (Insert) and 3.3.2 (Delete) come into play. If a foreign key attribute is modified, the DBMS must make sure that the new value refers to an existing tuple in the referenced relation (or is set to NULL). Similar options exist to deal with referential integrity violations caused by Update as those options discussed for the Delete operation. In fact, when a referential integrity constraint is specified in the DDL, the DBMS will allow the user to choose separate options to deal with a violation caused by Delete and a vio-lation caused by Update (see Section 4.2).

 

4. The Transaction Concept

 

A database application program running against a relational database typically executes one or more transactions. A transaction is an executing program that includes some database operations, such as reading from the database, or applying insertions, deletions, or updates to the database. At the end of the transaction, it must leave the database in a valid or consistent state that satisfies all the constraints spec-ified on the database schema. A single transaction may involve any number of retrieval operations (to be discussed as part of relational algebra and calculus in Chapter 6, and as a part of the language SQL in Chapters 4 and 5), and any number of update operations. These retrievals and updates will together form an atomic unit of work against the database. For example, a transaction to apply a bank with-drawal will typically read the user account record, check if there is a sufficient bal-ance, and then update the record by the withdrawal amount.

 

A large number of commercial applications running against relational databases in online transaction processing (OLTP) systems are executing transactions at rates that reach several hundred per second. Transaction processing concepts, concurrent execution of transactions, and recovery from failures will be discussed in Chapters 21 to 23.


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