Chapter: Java The Complete Reference - The Java Library - The Applet Class

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Applet Architecture

If you are already familiar with GUI programming, you will be right at home writing applets. If not, then there are a few key concepts you must understand.

Applet Architecture

 

As a general rule, an applet is a GUI-based program. As such, its architecture is different from the console-based programs shown in the first part of this book. If you are already familiar with GUI programming, you will be right at home writing applets. If not, then there are a few key concepts you must understand.

First, applets are event driven. Although we won’t examine event handling until the following chapter, it is important to understand in a general way how the event-driven architecture impacts the design of an applet. An applet resembles a set of interrupt service routines. Here is how the process works. An applet waits until an event occurs. The run-time system notifies the applet about an event by calling an event handler that has been provided by the applet. Once this happens, the applet must take appropriate action and then quickly return. This is a crucial point. For the most part, your applet should not enter a "mode" of operation in which it maintains control for an extended period. Instead, it must perform specific actions in response to events and then return control to the run-time system. In those situations in which your applet needs to perform a repetitive task on its own (for example, displaying a scrolling message across its window), you must start an additional thread of execution. (You will see an example later in this chapter.)

 

Second, the user initiates interaction with an applet—not the other way around. As you know, in a console-based program, when the program needs input, it will prompt the user and then call some input method, such as readLine( ). This is not the way it works in an applet. Instead, the user interacts with the applet as he or she wants, when he or she wants. These interactions are sent to the applet as events to which the applet must respond. For example, when the user clicks the mouse inside the applet’s window, a mouse-clicked event is generated. If the user presses a key while the applet’s window has input focus, a keypress event is generated. As you will see in later chapters, applets can contain various controls, such as push buttons and check boxes. When the user interacts with one of these controls, an event is generated.

 

While the architecture of an applet is not as easy to understand as that of a console-based program, Java makes it as simple as possible. If you have written programs for Windows (or other GUI-based operating systems), you know how intimidating that environment can be. Fortunately, Java provides a much cleaner approach that is more quickly mastered.


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