Chapter: Multicore Application Programming For Windows, Linux, and Oracle Solaris - Windows Threading

| Study Material, Lecturing Notes, Assignment, Reference, Wiki description explanation, brief detail |

Signaling Event Completion to Other Threads or Processes

Events are used to signal the fact that an event has happened to one or more threads. It is possible to use semaphores, mutexes, or condition variables to perform the same task.

Signaling Event Completion to Other Threads or Processes

 

Events are used to signal the fact that an event has happened to one or more threads. It is possible to use semaphores, mutexes, or condition variables to perform the same task. The threads waiting for an event to occur will wait on that event object. The thread that completes the task will set the event into the signaled state and the waiting threads are then released. Events can be of two types, a manually reset event type, which requires the event to be reset before other threads will once again wait on it, or an automatically reset type, which will reset itself after a single thread has been allowed to pass.

 

Events are kernel objects, so the call to CreateEvent() will return a handle. The call requires four parameters. The first parameter is the security attribute that determines whether the handle will be inherited by child processes. The second parameter is a boolean that, when true, indicates that the event requires a manual reset or, when false, indicates that the event will automatically reset after a single thread has been released. The third parameter indicates whether the event should be created in a signaled state. The fourth parameter is an optional name for the event.

 

Existing events can be opened using a call to OpenEvent(). This call requires three parameters. The first parameter is the access permissions; if this is zero, default access per-missions are requested. The second parameter is a boolean that indicates whether the handle should be inherited by child processes. The third parameter is the name of the event.

 

Since the event is a kernel object, it should be freed with a call to CloseHandle(). A call to SetEvent() places the event into the signaled state. This allows threads waiting on the event using WaitForSingleObject to be released. If the event requires a manual reset to get out of the signaled state, then this can be achieved with a call to ResetEvent(), which also takes the handle to the event. If the event object resets auto-matically, then only a single thread will be released before the event is reset.

 

Listing 6.23 shows an example of using an event object to order two threads. An event object is created by the call to CreateEvent(). This object requires manual reset and is created in the unsignaled state. Two threads are then created. The first thread exe-cutes the routine thread1() and waits on the event. The second thread executes the routine thread2(), which prints a message and then signals the event object. The signal allows the first thread to continue execution, and it prints a second message.

 

Listing 6.23   Using an Event Object to Enforce Execution Order

#include <windows.h>

 

#include <process.h>

 

#include <stdio.h>

 

HANDLE hevent;

 

unsigned int __stdcall thread1(void *param)

 

{

 

WaitForSingleObject(hevent,INFINITE);

 

printf("Thread 1 done\n"); return 0;

 

}

 

unsigned int __stdcall thread2(void *param)

 

{

 

printf("Thread 2 done\n");

SetEvent(hevent);

return 0;

 

}

 

 

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])

 

{

 

HANDLE hthread1, hthread2;

 

hevent=CreateEvent(0,0,0,0);

 

hthread1=(HANDLE)_beginthreadex(0,0,&thread1,0,0,0);

 

hthread2=(HANDLE)_beginthreadex(0,0,&thread2,0,0,0);

 

WaitForSingleObject(hthread1,INFINITE);

 

WaitForSingleObject(hthread2,INFINITE);

 

CloseHandle(hthread2);

 

CloseHandle(hthread1);

 

CloseHandle(hevent);

 

getchar();

 

return 0;

 

}


Study Material, Lecturing Notes, Assignment, Reference, Wiki description explanation, brief detail


Copyright © 2018-2020 BrainKart.com; All Rights Reserved. Developed by Therithal info, Chennai.