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Chapter: Mechanical - Manufacturing Technology - Abrasive Process and Broaching

Grinding Wheels

Grinding Wheels
A grinding wheel is an expendable wheel that is composed of an abrasive compound used for various grinding (abrasive cutting) and abrasive machining operations. They are used in grinding machines.


Grinding Wheels

 

A grinding wheel is an expendable wheel that is composed of an abrasive compound used for various grinding (abrasive cutting) and abrasive machining operations. They are used in grinding machines.

 

The wheels are generally made from a matrix of coarse particles pressed and bonded together to form a solid, circular shape. Various profiles and cross sections are available depending on the


intended usage for the wheel. They may also be made from a solid steel or aluminium disc with particles bonded to the surface.

 

The manufacture of these wheels is a precise and tightly controlled process, due not only to the inherent safety risks of a spinning disc, but also the composition and uniformity required to prevent that disc from exploding due to the high stresses produced on rotation.

 

There are five characteristics of a cutting wheel: material, grain size, wheel grade, grain spacing, and bond type. They will be indicated by codes on the wheel's label.

 

Abrasive Grain, the actual abrasive, is selected according to the hardness of the material being cut.

 

·       Aluminum Oxide (A)

 

·       Silicon Carbide (S)

 

·       Ceramic (C)

 

·       Diamond (D, MD, SD)

 

·       Cubic Boron Nitride (B)

 

Grinding wheels with diamond or Cubic Boron Nitride (CBN) grains are called superabrasives. Grinding wheels with Aluminum Oxide (corundum), Silicon Carbide or Ceramic grains are called conventional abrasives.

 

Grain size, from 8 (coarsest) 1200 (finest), determines the physical size of the abrasive grains in the wheel. A larger grain will cut freely, allowing fast cutting but poor surface finish. Ultra-fine grain sizes are for precision finish work.

 

Wheel grade, from A (soft) to Z (hard), determines how tightly the bond holds the abrasive. Grade affects almost all considerations of grinding, such as wheel speed, coolant flow, maximum and minimum feed rates, and grinding depth.

 

Grain spacing, or structure, from 1 (densest) to 16 (least dense). Density is the ratio of bond and abrasive to air space. A less-dense wheel will cut freely, and has a large effect on surface finish. It is also able to take a deeper or wider cut with less coolant, as the chip clearance on the wheel is greater.

 

Wheel bond, how the wheel holds the abrasives, affects finish, coolant, and minimum/maximum wheel speed.

 

 

 

 

·       Vitrified (V)

 

·       Resinoid (B)

 

·       Silicate (S)

 

 

·       Shellac (E)

 

·       Rubber (R)

 

·       Metal (M)

 

·       Oxychloride (O)

 

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