Home | | Modern Pharmacology with Clinical Applications | Muscarinic Blocking Drugs: Antimuscarinic Poisoning

Chapter: Modern Pharmacology with Clinical Applications: Muscarinic Blocking Drugs

| Study Material, Lecturing Notes, Assignment, Reference, Wiki description explanation, brief detail |

Muscarinic Blocking Drugs: Antimuscarinic Poisoning

Antimuscarinic poisoning can result from the intake of excessive doses of belladonna alkaloids, synthetic an-timuscarinic drugs, and drugs from other pharmacolog-ical groups that have significant antimuscarinic activity.

ANTIMUSCARINIC POISONING

Antimuscarinic poisoning can result from the intake of excessive doses of belladonna alkaloids, synthetic an-timuscarinic drugs, and drugs from other pharmacolog-ical groups that have significant antimuscarinic activity (Table 13.2).


Signs of peripheral muscarinic blockade (e.g., speech disturbances, swallowing difficulties, cardioac-celeration, and pupillary dilation) are most common at lower doses, whereas CNS effects (e.g., headache, rest-lessness, ataxia, and hallucinations) are more apparent after large doses. Antimuscarinic drugs can produce atrial arrhythmias, A-V dissociation, and ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. Many cases of antimus-carinic poisoning can be managed by removing unab- sorbed drug, treating symptoms, and providing support-ive therapy. However, any life-threatening effects (i.e., seizures, severe hypertension, hallucinations, or life-threatening arrhythmias) would justify the use of spe-cific antidotal therapy with the cholinesterase-inhibiting compound physostigmine. Special caution should be employed if the patient has any disorder that might be aggravated by the cholinergic stimulation resulting from the use of physostigmine.

Study Material, Lecturing Notes, Assignment, Reference, Wiki description explanation, brief detail


Copyright © 2018-2020 BrainKart.com; All Rights Reserved. Developed by Therithal info, Chennai.