Chapter: Fundamentals of Database Systems - The Relational Data Model and SQL - More SQL: Complex Queries, Triggers, Views, and Schema Modification

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More Complex SQL Retrieval Queries

1. Comparisons Involving NULL and Three-Valued Logic 2. Nested Queries, Tuples, and Set/Multiset Comparisons 3. Correlated Nested Queries 4. The EXISTS and UNIQUE Functions in SQL 5. Explicit Sets and Renaming of Attributes in SQL 6. Joined Tables in SQL and Outer Joins 7. Aggregate Functions in SQL 8. Grouping: The GROUP BY and HAVING Clauses 9. Discussion and Summary of SQL Queries

More Complex SQL Retrieval Queries

 

In Section 4.3, we described some basic types of retrieval queries in SQL. Because of the generality and expressive power of the language, there are many additional features that allow users to specify more complex retrievals from the database. We dis-cuss several of these features in this section.

 

1. Comparisons Involving NULL and Three-Valued Logic

 

SQL has various rules for dealing with NULL values. Recall from Section 3.1.2 that NULL is used to represent a missing value, but that it usually has one of three different interpretations—value unknown (exists but is not known), value not available (exists but is purposely withheld), or value not applicable (the attribute is undefined for this tuple). Consider the following examples to illustrate each of the meanings of NULL.

 

                                                    Unknown value. A person’s date of birth is not known, so it is represented by NULL in the database.

 

                                                    Unavailable or withheld value. A person has a home phone but does not want it to be listed, so it is withheld and represented as NULL in the database.

 

                                                    Not applicable attribute. An attribute LastCollegeDegree would be NULL for a person who has no college degrees because it does not apply to that person.

 

It is often not possible to determine which of the meanings is intended; for example, a NULL for the home phone of a person can have any of the three meanings. Hence, SQL does not distinguish between the different meanings of NULL.

 

In general, each individual NULL value is considered to be different from every other NULL value in the various database records. When a NULL is involved in a compari-son operation, the result is considered to be UNKNOWN (it may be TRUE or it may be FALSE). Hence, SQL uses a three-valued logic with values TRUE, FALSE, and UNKNOWN instead of the standard two-valued (Boolean) logic with values TRUE or FALSE. It is therefore necessary to define the results (or truth values) of three-valued logical expressions when the logical connectives AND, OR, and NOT are used. Table 5.1 shows the resulting values.

 

Table 5.1     Logical Connectives in Three-Valued Logic


In Tables 5.1(a) and 5.1(b), the rows and columns represent the values of the results of comparison conditions, which would typically appear in the WHERE clause of an SQL query. Each expression result would have a value of TRUE, FALSE, or UNKNOWN. The result of combining the two values using the AND logical connec-tive is shown by the entries in Table 5.1(a). Table 5.1(b) shows the result of using the OR logical connective. For example, the result of (FALSE AND UNKNOWN) is FALSE, whereas the result of (FALSE OR UNKNOWN) is UNKNOWN. Table 5.1(c) shows the result of the NOT logical operation. Notice that in standard Boolean logic, only TRUE or FALSE values are permitted; there is no UNKNOWN value.

 

In select-project-join queries, the general rule is that only those combinations of tuples that evaluate the logical expression in the WHERE clause of the query to TRUE are selected. Tuple combinations that evaluate to FALSE or UNKNOWN are not selected. However, there are exceptions to that rule for certain operations, such as outer joins, as we shall see in Section 5.1.6.

 

SQL allows queries that check whether an attribute value is NULL. Rather than using = or <> to compare an attribute value to NULL, SQL uses the comparison operators IS or IS NOT. This is because SQL considers each NULL value as being distinct from every other NULL value, so equality comparison is not appropriate. It follows that when a join condition is specified, tuples with NULL values for the join attributes are not included in the result (unless it is an OUTER JOIN; see Section 5.1.6). Query 18 illustrates this.

 

Query 18. Retrieve the names of all employees who do not have supervisors.

 

Q18:       SELECT  Fname, Lname

 

FROM                   EMPLOYEE

 

WHERE                Super_ssn IS NULL;

 

2. Nested Queries, Tuples, and Set/Multiset Comparisons

 

Some queries require that existing values in the database be fetched and then used in a comparison condition. Such queries can be conveniently formulated by using nested queries, which are complete select-from-where blocks within the WHERE clause of another query. That other query is called the outer query. Query 4 is for-mulated in Q4 without a nested query, but it can be rephrased to use nested queries as shown in Q4A. Q4A introduces the comparison operator IN, which compares a value v with a set (or multiset) of values V and evaluates to TRUE if v is one of the elements in V.

 

The first nested query selects the project numbers of projects that have an employee with last name ‘Smith’ involved as manager, while the second nested query selects the project numbers of projects that have an employee with last name ‘Smith’ involved as worker. In the outer query, we use the OR logical connective to retrieve a PROJECT tuple if the PNUMBER value of that tuple is in the result of either nested query.

Q4A:SELECT DISTINCT Pnumber

FROM PROJECT     

WHERE          Pnumber IN   

            ( SELECT       Pnumber

            FROM PROJECT, DEPARTMENT, EMPLOYEE

            WHERE          Dnum=Dnumber AND

                        Mgr_ssn=Ssn AND Lname=‘Smith’ )

            OR     

            Pnumber IN   

            ( SELECT       Pno

            FROM WORKS_ON, EMPLOYEE

            WHERE          Essn=Ssn AND Lname=‘Smith’ );

If a nested query returns a single attribute and a single tuple, the query result will be a single (scalar) value. In such cases, it is permissible to use = instead of IN for the comparison operator. In general, the nested query will return a table (relation), which is a set or multiset of tuples.

 

SQL allows the use of tuples of values in comparisons by placing them within parentheses. To illustrate this, consider the following query:

 

SELECT                              DISTINCT Essn

 

FROM                                 WORKS_ON

 

WHERE                              (Pno, Hours) IN ( SELECT     Pno, Hours

 

FROM                                                                  WORKS_ON

 

WHERE Essn=‘123456789’ );

 

This query will select the Essns of all employees who work the same (project, hours) combination on some project that employee ‘John Smith’ (whose Ssn = ‘123456789’) works on. In this example, the IN operator compares the subtuple of values in parentheses (Pno, Hours) within each tuple in WORKS_ON with the set of type-compatible tuples produced by the nested query.

 

In addition to the IN operator, a number of other comparison operators can be used to compare a single value v (typically an attribute name) to a set or multiset v (typ-ically a nested query). The = ANY (or = SOME) operator returns TRUE if the value v is equal to some value in the set V and is hence equivalent to IN. The two keywords ANY and SOME have the same effect. Other operators that can be combined with ANY (or SOME) include >, >=, <, <=, and <>. The keyword ALL can also be com-bined with each of these operators. For example, the comparison condition (v > ALL V ) returns TRUE if the value v is greater than all the values in the set (or multiset) V. An example is the following query, which returns the names of employees whose salary is greater than the salary of all the employees in department 5:

 

SELECT Lname, Fname

 

FROM EMPLOYEE

 

WHERE Salary > ALL ( SELECT Salary

 

FROM EMPLOYEE WHERE Dno=5 );

Notice that this query can also be specified using the MAX aggregate function (see Section 5.1.7).

 

In general, we can have several levels of nested queries. We can once again be faced with possible ambiguity among attribute names if attributes of the same name exist—one in a relation in the FROM clause of the outer query, and another in a rela-tion in the FROM clause of the nested query. The rule is that a reference to an unqualified attribute refers to the relation declared in the innermost nested query. For example, in the SELECT clause and WHERE clause of the first nested query of Q4A, a reference to any unqualified attribute of the PROJECT relation refers to the PROJECT relation specified in the FROM clause of the nested query. To refer to an attribute of the PROJECT relation specified in the outer query, we specify and refer to an alias (tuple variable) for that relation. These rules are similar to scope rules for program variables in most programming languages that allow nested procedures and functions. To illustrate the potential ambiguity of attribute names in nested queries, consider Query 16.

 

Query 16. Retrieve the name of each employee who has a dependent with the same first name and is the same sex as the employee.

 

Q16: SELECT E.Fname, E.Lname

 

FROM EMPLOYEE AS E

 

WHERE E.Ssn INSELECT Essn

 

FROM DEPENDENT AS D

 

WHERE E.Fname=D.Dependent_name

 

AND E.Sex=D.Sex );

 

In the nested query of Q16, we must qualify E.Sex because it refers to the Sex attribute of EMPLOYEE from the outer query, and DEPENDENT also has an attribute called Sex. If there were any unqualified references to Sex in the nested query, they would refer to the Sex attribute of DEPENDENT. However, we would not have to qualify the attributes Fname and Ssn of EMPLOYEE if they appeared in the nested query because the DEPENDENT relation does not have attributes called Fname and Ssn, so there is no ambiguity.

 

It is generally advisable to create tuple variables (aliases) for all the tables referenced in an SQL query to avoid potential errors and ambiguities, as illustrated in Q16.

 

3. Correlated Nested Queries

 

Whenever a condition in the WHERE clause of a nested query references some attribute of a relation declared in the outer query, the two queries are said to be correlated. We can understand a correlated query better by considering that the nested query is evaluated once for each tuple (or combination of tuples) in the outer query. For example, we can think of Q16 as follows: For each EMPLOYEE tuple, evaluate the nested query, which retrieves the Essn values for all DEPENDENT tuples with the same sex and name as that EMPLOYEE tuple; if the Ssn value of the EMPLOYEE tuple is in the result of the nested query, then select that EMPLOYEE tuple.

In general, a query written with nested select-from-where blocks and using the = or IN comparison operators can always be expressed as a single block query. For exam-ple, Q16 may be written as in Q16A:

 

Q16A: SELECT E.Fname, E.Lname

 

FROM EMPLOYEE AS E, DEPENDENT AS D

WHERE E.Ssn=D.Essn AND E.Sex=D.Sex

AND E.Fname=D.Dependent_name;

 

4. The EXISTS and UNIQUE Functions in SQL

 

The EXISTS function in SQL is used to check whether the result of a correlated nested query is empty (contains no tuples) or not. The result of EXISTS is a Boolean value TRUE if the nested query result contains at least one tuple, or FALSE if the nested query result contains no tuples. We illustrate the use of EXISTS—and NOT EXISTSwith some examples. First, we formulate Query 16 in an alternative form that uses EXISTS as in Q16B:

 

Q16B:   SELECT E.Fname, E.Lname

FROM EMPLOYEE AS E

WHERE EXISTS ( SELECT *

 FROM DEPENDENT AS D

 WHERE E.Ssn=D.Essn AND E.Sex=D.Sex

  AND E.Fname=D.Dependent_name);

EXISTS and NOT EXISTS are typically used in conjunction with a correlated nested query. In Q16B, the nested query references the Ssn, Fname, and Sex attributes of the EMPLOYEE relation from the outer query. We can think of Q16B as follows: For each EMPLOYEE tuple, evaluate the nested query, which retrieves all DEPENDENT tuples with the same Essn, Sex, and Dependent_name as the EMPLOYEE tuple; if at least one tuple EXISTS in the result of the nested query, then select that EMPLOYEE tuple. In general, EXISTS(Q) returns TRUE if there is at least one tuple in the result of the nested query Q, and it returns FALSE otherwise. On the other hand, NOT EXISTS(Q) returns TRUE if there are no tuples in the result of nested query Q, and it returns FALSE otherwise. Next, we illustrate the use of NOT EXISTS.

 

Query 6. Retrieve the names of employees who have no dependents.

 

Q6: SELECT Fname, Lname

 

FROM EMPLOYEE

 

WHERE NOT EXISTS ( SELECT *

 

FROM DEPENDENT

 

WHERE Ssn=Essn );

 

In Q6, the correlated nested query retrieves all DEPENDENT tuples related to a par-ticular EMPLOYEE tuple. If none exist, the EMPLOYEE tuple is selected because the WHERE-clause condition will evaluate to TRUE in this case. We can explain Q6 as follows: For each EMPLOYEE tuple, the correlated nested query selects all DEPENDENT tuples whose Essn value matches the EMPLOYEE Ssn; if the result is empty, no dependents are related to the employee, so we select that EMPLOYEE tuple and retrieve its Fname and Lname.

 

Query 7. List the names of managers who have at least one dependent.

 

Q7:    SELECT     Fname, Lname     

          FROM        EMPLOYEE       

          WHERE     EXISTS ( SELECT        *

                   FROM        DEPENDENT

                   WHERE     Ssn=Essn )

                   AND

                   EXISTS ( SELECT        *

                   FROM        DEPARTMENT

                   WHERE     Ssn=Mgr_ssn );

One way to write this query is shown in Q7, where we specify two nested correlated queries; the first selects all DEPENDENT tuples related to an EMPLOYEE, and the sec-ond selects all DEPARTMENT tuples managed by the EMPLOYEE. If at least one of the first and at least one of the second exists, we select the EMPLOYEE tuple. Can you rewrite this query using only a single nested query or no nested queries?

 

The query Q3: Retrieve the name of each employee who works on all the projects con-trolled by department number 5 can be written using EXISTS and NOT EXISTS in SQL systems. We show two ways of specifying this query Q3 in SQL as Q3A and Q3B. This is an example of certain types of queries that require universal quantification, as we will discuss in Section 6.6.7. One way to write this query is to use the construct (S2 EXCEPT S1) as explained next, and checking whether the result is empty. This option is shown as Q3A.

 

Q3A:       SELECT  Fname, Lname

 

FROM                   EMPLOYEE

 

WHERE                NOT EXISTS ( (  SELECT Pnumber

 

FROM                                                     PROJECT

 

WHERE                                                  Dnum=5)

 

EXCEPT                                               ( SELECT  Pno

 

FROM                                                                   WORKS_ON

 

WHERE                                                                Ssn=Essn) );

 

In Q3A, the first subquery (which is not correlated with the outer query) selects all projects controlled by department 5, and the second subquery (which is correlated) selects all projects that the particular employee being considered works on. If the set difference of the first subquery result MINUS (EXCEPT) the second subquery result is empty, it means that the employee works on all the projects and is therefore selected.

 

The second option is shown as Q3B. Notice that we need two-level nesting in Q3B and that this formulation is quite a bit more complex than Q3A, which uses NOT EXISTS and EXCEPT.

 

Q3B:                              SELECT        Lname, Fname

 

FROM                                       EMPLOYEE

 

WHERE                                    NOT EXISTS          ( SELECT    *

 

FROM                                                                    WORKS_ON B

 

WHERE                                                                 ( B.Pno IN          ( SELECT       Pnumber

 

FROM                                                                                              PROJECT

 

WHERE                                                                                           Dnum=5 )

 

AND

 

NOT EXISTS  ( SELECT                                                            *

 

FROM WORKS_ON C

 

WHERE                                                                                   C.Essn=Ssn

AND                                                                                        C.Pno=B.Pno )));

 

In Q3B, the outer nested query selects any WORKS_ON (B) tuples whose Pno is of a project controlled by department 5, if there is not a WORKS_ON (C) tuple with the same Pno and the same Ssn as that of the EMPLOYEE tuple under consideration in the outer query. If no such tuple exists, we select the EMPLOYEE tuple. The form of Q3B matches the following rephrasing of Query 3: Select each employee such that there does not exist a project controlled by department 5 that the employee does not work on. It corresponds to the way we will write this query in tuple relation calculus (see Section 6.6.7).

 

There is another SQL function, UNIQUE(Q), which returns TRUE if there are no duplicate tuples in the result of query Q; otherwise, it returns FALSE. This can be used to test whether the result of a nested query is a set or a multiset.

 

5. Explicit Sets and Renaming of Attributes in SQL

 

We have seen several queries with a nested query in the WHERE clause. It is also pos-sible to use an explicit set of values in the WHERE clause, rather than a nested query. Such a set is enclosed in parentheses in SQL.

 

Query 17. Retrieve the Social Security numbers of all employees who work on project numbers 1, 2, or 3.

 

Q17:                               SELECT  DISTINCT Essn

 

FROM                                          WORKS_ON

 

WHERE                                        Pno IN (1, 2, 3);

 

In SQL, it is possible to rename any attribute that appears in the result of a query by adding the qualifier AS followed by the desired new name. Hence, the AS construct can be used to alias both attribute and relation names, and it can be used in both the SELECT and FROM clauses. For example, Q8A shows how query Q8 from Section 4.3.2 can be slightly changed to retrieve the last name of each employee and his or her supervisor, while renaming the resulting attribute names as Employee_name and Supervisor_name. The new names will appear as column headers in the query result.

 

Q8A:                              SELECT  E.Lname AS Employee_name, S.Lname AS Supervisor_name

 

FROM                                          EMPLOYEE AS E, EMPLOYEE AS S

WHERE                                        E.Super_ssn=S.Ssn;


6. Joined Tables in SQL and Outer Joins

 

The concept of a joined table (or joined relation) was incorporated into SQL to permit users to specify a table resulting from a join operation in the FROM clause of a query. This construct may be easier to comprehend than mixing together all the select and join conditions in the WHERE clause. For example, consider query Q1, which retrieves the name and address of every employee who works for the ‘Research’ department. It may be easier to specify the join of the EMPLOYEE and DEPARTMENT relations first, and then to select the desired tuples and attributes. This can be written in SQL as in Q1A:

 

Q1A:       SELECT  Fname, Lname, Address

 

FROM                   (EMPLOYEE JOIN DEPARTMENT ON Dno=Dnumber)

WHERE                Dname=‘Research’;

 

The FROM clause in Q1A contains a single joined table. The attributes of such a table are all the attributes of the first table, EMPLOYEE, followed by all the attributes of the second table, DEPARTMENT. The concept of a joined table also allows the user to specify different types of join, such as NATURAL JOIN and various types of OUTER JOIN. In a NATURAL JOIN on two relations R and S, no join condition is specified; an implicit EQUIJOIN condition for each pair of attributes with the same name from R and S is created. Each such pair of attributes is included only once in the resulting relation (see Section 6.3.2 and 6.4.4 for more details on the various types of join operations in relational algebra).

 

If the names of the join attributes are not the same in the base relations, it is possi-ble to rename the attributes so that they match, and then to apply NATURAL JOIN. In this case, the AS construct can be used to rename a relation and all its attributes in the FROM clause. This is illustrated in Q1B, where the DEPARTMENT relation is renamed as DEPT and its attributes are renamed as Dname, Dno (to match the name of the desired join attribute Dno in the EMPLOYEE table), Mssn, and Msdate. The implied join condition for this NATURAL JOIN is EMPLOYEE.Dno=DEPT.Dno, because this is the only pair of attributes with the same name after renaming:

 

Q1B:       SELECT  Fname, Lname, Address

 

FROM                   (EMPLOYEE NATURAL JOIN

(DEPARTMENT AS DEPT (Dname, Dno, Mssn, Msdate)))

WHERE                Dname=‘Research’;

 

The default type of join in a joined table is called an inner join, where a tuple is included in the result only if a matching tuple exists in the other relation. For exam-ple, in query Q8A, only employees who have a supervisor are included in the result; an EMPLOYEE tuple whose value for Super_ssn is NULL is excluded. If the user requires that all employees be included, an OUTER JOIN must be used explicitly (see Section 6.4.4 for the definition of OUTER JOIN). In SQL, this is handled by explicitly specifying the keyword OUTER JOIN in a joined table, as illustrated in Q8B:

 

Q8B:       SELECT  E.Lname AS Employee_name,

 

S.Lname AS Supervisor_name

 

FROM                   (EMPLOYEE AS E LEFT OUTER JOIN EMPLOYEE AS S

ON E.Super_ssn=S.Ssn);

There are a variety of outer join operations, which we shall discuss in more detail in Section 6.4.4. In SQL, the options available for specifying joined tables include INNER JOIN (only pairs of tuples that match the join condition are retrieved, same as JOIN), LEFT OUTER JOIN (every tuple in the left table must appear in the result; if it does not have a matching tuple, it is padded with NULL values for the attributes of the right table), RIGHT OUTER JOIN (every tuple in the right table must appear in the result; if it does not have a matching tuple, it is padded with NULL values for the attributes of the left table), and FULL OUTER JOIN. In the latter three options, the keyword OUTER may be omitted. If the join attributes have the same name, one can also specify the natural join variation of outer joins by using the keyword NATURAL before the operation (for example, NATURAL LEFT OUTER JOIN). The keyword CROSS JOIN is used to specify the CARTESIAN PRODUCT operation (see Section 6.2.2), although this should be used only with the utmost care because it generates all possible tuple combinations.

 

It is also possible to nest join specifications; that is, one of the tables in a join may itself be a joined table. This allows the specification of the join of three or more tables as a single joined table, which is called a multiway join. For example, Q2A is a different way of specifying query Q2 from Section 4.3.1 using the concept of a joined table:

 

Q2A:                              SELECT  Pnumber, Dnum, Lname, Address, Bdate

 

FROM                                          ((PROJECT JOIN DEPARTMENT ON Dnum=Dnumber)

JOIN EMPLOYEE ON Mgr_ssn=Ssn)

WHERE                                        Plocation=‘Stafford’;

 

Not all SQL implementations have implemented the new syntax of joined tables. In some systems, a different syntax was used to specify outer joins by using the com-parison operators +=, =+, and +=+ for left, right, and full outer join, respectively, when specifying the join condition. For example, this syntax is available in Oracle. To specify the left outer join in Q8B using this syntax, we could write the query Q8C as follows:

 

Q8C:                              SELECT  E.Lname, S.Lname

FROM                                          EMPLOYEE E, EMPLOYEE S

WHERE                                        E.Super_ssn += S.Ssn;

 

7. Aggregate Functions in SQL

 

In Section 6.4.2, we will introduce the concept of an aggregate function as a relational algebra operation. Aggregate functions are used to summarize information from multiple tuples into a single-tuple summary. Grouping is used to create sub-groups of tuples before summarization. Grouping and aggregation are required in many database applications, and we will introduce their use in SQL through exam-ples. A number of built-in aggregate functions exist: COUNT, SUM, MAX, MIN, and AVG. The COUNT function returns the number of tuples or values as specified in a query. The functions SUM, MAX, MIN, and AVG can be applied to a set or multiset of numeric values and return, respectively, the sum, maximum value, minimum value, and average (mean) of those values. These functions can be used in the SELECT clause or in a HAVING clause (which we introduce later). The functions MAX and MIN can also be used with attributes that have nonnumeric domains if the domain values have a total ordering among one another. We illustrate the use of these functions with sample queries.

 

Query 19. Find the sum of the salaries of all employees, the maximum salary, the minimum salary, and the average salary.

 

Q19:       SELECT  SUM (Salary), MAX (Salary), MIN (Salary), AVG (Salary)

FROM                   EMPLOYEE;

 

If we want to get the preceding function values for employees of a specific depart-ment—say, the ‘Research’ department—we can write Query 20, where the EMPLOYEE tuples are restricted by the WHERE clause to those employees who work for the ‘Research’ department.

 

Query 20. Find the sum of the salaries of all employees of the ‘Research’ department, as well as the maximum salary, the minimum salary, and the aver-age salary in this department.

 

Q20:       SELECT  SUM (Salary), MAX (Salary), MIN (Salary), AVG (Salary)

FROM                   (EMPLOYEE JOIN DEPARTMENT ON Dno=Dnumber)

WHERE                Dname=‘Research’;

 

Queries 21 and 22. Retrieve the total number of employees in the company (Q21) and the number of employees in the ‘Research’ department (Q22).

 

Q21:  SELECT     COUNT (*)

          FROM        EMPLOYEE;

Q22:  SELECT     COUNT (*)

          FROM        EMPLOYEE, DEPARTMENT

          WHERE     DNO=DNUMBER AND DNAME=‘Research’;

Here the asterisk (*) refers to the rows (tuples), so COUNT (*) returns the number of rows in the result of the query. We may also use the COUNT function to count values in a column rather than tuples, as in the next example.

 

Query 23. Count the number of distinct salary values in the database.

 

Q23:       SELECT  COUNT (DISTINCT Salary)

FROM                   EMPLOYEE;

 

If we write COUNT(SALARY) instead of COUNT(DISTINCT SALARY) in Q23, then duplicate values will not be eliminated. However, any tuples with NULL for SALARY

will not be counted. In general, NULL values are discarded when aggregate func-tions are applied to a particular column (attribute).

 

The preceding examples summarize a whole relation (Q19, Q21, Q23) or a selected subset of tuples (Q20, Q22), and hence all produce single tuples or single values. They illustrate how functions are applied to retrieve a summary value or summary tuple from the database. These functions can also be used in selection conditions involving nested queries. We can specify a correlated nested query with an aggregate function, and then use the nested query in the WHERE clause of an outer query. For example, to retrieve the names of all employees who have two or more dependents (Query 5), we can write the following:

 

Q5:                                SELECT  Lname, Fname

 

FROM                                          EMPLOYEE

 

WHERE                                        ( SELECT COUNT (*)

 

FROM DEPENDENT

 

WHERE                                                      Ssn=Essn ) >= 2;

 

The correlated nested query counts the number of dependents that each employee has; if this is greater than or equal to two, the employee tuple is selected.

 

8. Grouping: The GROUP BY and HAVING Clauses

 

In many cases we want to apply the aggregate functions to subgroups of tuples in a relation, where the subgroups are based on some attribute values. For example, we may want to find the average salary of employees in each department or the number of employees who work on each project. In these cases we need to partition the relation into nonoverlapping subsets (or groups) of tuples. Each group (partition) will consist of the tuples that have the same value of some attribute(s), called the grouping attribute(s). We can then apply the function to each such group inde-pendently to produce summary information about each group. SQL has a GROUP BY clause for this purpose. The GROUP BY clause specifies the grouping attributes, which should also appear in the SELECT clause, so that the value resulting from applying each aggregate function to a group of tuples appears along with the value of the grouping attribute(s).

 

Query 24. For each department, retrieve the department number, the number of employees in the department, and their average salary.

 

Q24:                               SELECT  Dno, COUNT (*), AVG (Salary)

 

FROM                                          EMPLOYEE

 

GROUP BY                                   Dno;

 

In Q24, the EMPLOYEE tuples are partitioned into groups—each group having the same value for the grouping attribute Dno. Hence, each group contains the employees who work in the same department. The COUNT and AVG functions are applied to each such group of tuples. Notice that the SELECT clause includes only the grouping attribute and the aggregate functions to be applied on each group of tuples. Figure 5.1(a) illustrates how grouping works on Q24; it also shows the result of Q24.




If NULLs exist in the grouping attribute, then a separate group is created for all tuples with a NULL value in the grouping attribute. For example, if the EMPLOYEE table had some tuples that had NULL for the grouping attribute Dno, there would be a separate group for those tuples in the result of Q24.

 

Query 25. For each project, retrieve the project number, the project name, and the number of employees who work on that project.

 

Q25:                               SELECT  Pnumber, Pname, COUNT (*)

FROM                                          PROJECT, WORKS_ON

WHERE                                        Pnumber=Pno

 

GROUP BY                                   Pnumber, Pname;

 

Q25 shows how we can use a join condition in conjunction with GROUP BY. In this case, the grouping and functions are applied after the joining of the two relations. Sometimes we want to retrieve the values of these functions only for groups that sat-isfy certain conditions. For example, suppose that we want to modify Query 25 so that only projects with more than two employees appear in the result. SQL provides a HAVING clause, which can appear in conjunction with a GROUP BY clause, for this purpose. HAVING provides a condition on the summary information regarding the group of tuples associated with each value of the grouping attributes. Only the groups that satisfy the condition are retrieved in the result of the query. This is illus-trated by Query 26.

 

Query 26. For each project on which more than two employees work, retrieve the project number, the project name, and the number of employees who work on the project.

 

Q26:                               SELECT  Pnumber, Pname, COUNT (*)

FROM                                          PROJECT, WORKS_ON

WHERE                                        Pnumber=Pno

 

GROUP BY                                   Pnumber, Pname

 

HAVING                                       COUNT (*) > 2;

 

Notice that while selection conditions in the WHERE clause limit the tuples to which functions are applied, the HAVING clause serves to choose whole groups. Figure 5.1(b) illustrates the use of HAVING and displays the result of Q26.

 

Query 27. For each project, retrieve the project number, the project name, and the number of employees from department 5 who work on the project.

 

Q27:                               SELECT  Pnumber, Pname, COUNT (*)

FROM                                          PROJECT, WORKS_ON, EMPLOYEE

 

WHERE                                        Pnumber=Pno AND Ssn=Essn AND Dno=5

 

GROUP BY                                   Pnumber, Pname;

 

Here we restrict the tuples in the relation (and hence the tuples in each group) to those that satisfy the condition specified in the WHERE clause—namely, that they work in department number 5. Notice that we must be extra careful when two dif-ferent conditions apply (one to the aggregate function in the SELECT clause and another to the function in the HAVING clause). For example, suppose that we want to count the total number of employees whose salaries exceed $40,000 in each department, but only for departments where more than five employees work. Here, the condition (SALARY > 40000) applies only to the COUNT function in the SELECT clause. Suppose that we write the following incorrect query:

 

SELECT      Dname, COUNT (*)

FROM          DEPARTMENT, EMPLOYEE

 

WHERE       Dnumber=Dno AND Salary>40000

 

GROUP BY  Dname

 

HAVING       COUNT (*) > 5;

 

This is incorrect because it will select only departments that have more than five employees who each earn more than $40,000. The rule is that the WHERE clause is executed first, to select individual tuples or joined tuples; the HAVING clause is applied later, to select individual groups of tuples. Hence, the tuples are already restricted to employees who earn more than $40,000 before the function in the HAVING clause is applied. One way to write this query correctly is to use a nested query, as shown in Query 28.

 

Query 28. For each department that has more than five employees, retrieve the department number and the number of its employees who are making more than $40,000.

 

Q28:       SELECT  Dnumber, COUNT (*)

FROM                   DEPARTMENT, EMPLOYEE

 

WHERE                Dnumber=Dno AND Salary>40000 AND

( SELECT                                 Dno

 

FROM                                      EMPLOYEE

 

GROUP BY Dno

 

HAVING                                   COUNT (*) > 5)

 

9. Discussion and Summary of SQL Queries

 

A retrieval query in SQL can consist of up to six clauses, but only the first two— SELECT and FROM—are mandatory. The query can span several lines, and is ended by a semicolon. Query terms are separated by spaces, and parentheses can be used to group relevant parts of a query in the standard way. The clauses are specified in the following order, with the clauses between square brackets [ ... ] being optional:

 

SELECT <attribute and function list> FROM <table list>

[ WHERE <condition> ]

 

[ GROUP BY <grouping attribute(s)> ] [ HAVING <group condition> ]

[ ORDER BY <attribute list> ];

 

The SELECT clause lists the attributes or functions to be retrieved. The FROM clause specifies all relations (tables) needed in the query, including joined relations, but not those in nested queries. The WHERE clause specifies the conditions for selecting the tuples from these relations, including join conditions if needed. GROUP BY specifies grouping attributes, whereas HAVING specifies a condition on the groups being selected rather than on the individual tuples. The built-in aggregate functions COUNT, SUM, MIN, MAX, and AVG are used in conjunction with grouping, but they can also be applied to all the selected tuples in a query without a GROUP BY clause. Finally, ORDER BY specifies an order for displaying the result of a query.

 

In order to formulate queries correctly, it is useful to consider the steps that define the meaning or semantics of each query. A query is evaluated conceptually by first applying the FROM clause (to identify all tables involved in the query or to material-ize any joined tables), followed by the WHERE clause to select and join tuples, and then by GROUP BY and HAVING. Conceptually, ORDER BY is applied at the end to sort the query result. If none of the last three clauses (GROUP BY, HAVING, and ORDER BY) are specified, we can think conceptually of a query as being executed as follows: For each combination of tuples—one from each of the relations specified in the FROM clause—evaluate the WHERE clause; if it evaluates to TRUE, place the values of the attributes specified in the SELECT clause from this tuple combination in the result of the query. Of course, this is not an efficient way to implement the query in a real system, and each DBMS has special query optimization routines to decide on an execution plan that is efficient to execute. We discuss query processing and optimization in Chapter 19.

 

In general, there are numerous ways to specify the same query in SQL. This flexibility in specifying queries has advantages and disadvantages. The main advantage is that users can choose the technique with which they are most comfortable when specifying a query. For example, many queries may be specified with join conditions in the WHERE clause, or by using joined relations in the FROM clause, or with some form of nested queries and the IN comparison operator. Some users may be more comfortable with one approach, whereas others may be more comfortable with another. From the programmer’s and the system’s point of view regarding query optimization, it is generally preferable to write a query with as little nesting and implied ordering as possible.

 

The disadvantage of having numerous ways of specifying the same query is that this may confuse the user, who may not know which technique to use to specify particular types of queries. Another problem is that it may be more efficient to execute a query specified in one way than the same query specified in an alternative way. Ideally, this should not be the case: The DBMS should process the same query in the same way regardless of how the query is specified. But this is quite difficult in practice, since each DBMS has different methods for processing queries specified in different ways. Thus, an additional burden on the user is to determine which of the alternative specifications is the most efficient to execute. Ideally, the user should worry only about specifying the query correctly, whereas the DBMS would deter-mine how to execute the query efficiently. In practice, however, it helps if the user is aware of which types of constructs in a query are more expensive to process than others (see Chapter 20).


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