Chapter: Fundamentals of Database Systems - Transaction Processing, Concurrency Control, and Recovery - Database Recovery Techniques

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Shadow Paging

This recovery scheme does not require the use of a log in a single-user environment.

Shadow Paging

 

This recovery scheme does not require the use of a log in a single-user environment. In a multiuser environment, a log may be needed for the concurrency control method. Shadow paging considers the database to be made up of a number of fixed-size disk pages (or disk blocks)—say, n—for recovery purposes. A directory with n entries is constructed, where the ith entry points to the ith database page on disk. The directory is kept in main memory if it is not too large, and all references—reads or writes—to database pages on disk go through it. When a transaction begins executing, the current directory—whose entries point to the most recent or current database pages on disk—is copied into a shadow directory. The shadow directory is then saved on disk while the current directory is used by the transaction.

 

During transaction execution, the shadow directory is never modified. When a write_item operation is performed, a new copy of the modified database page is created, but the old copy of that page is not overwritten. Instead, the new page is writ-ten elsewhere—on some previously unused disk block. The current directory entry is modified to point to the new disk block, whereas the shadow directory is not modified and continues to point to the old unmodified disk block. Figure 23.4 illustrates the concepts of shadow and current directories. For pages updated by the transaction, two versions are kept. The old version is referenced by the shadow directory and the new version by the current directory.


To recover from a failure during transaction execution, it is sufficient to free the modified database pages and to discard the current directory. The state of the data-base before transaction execution is available through the shadow directory, and that state is recovered by reinstating the shadow directory. The database thus is returned to its state prior to the transaction that was executing when the crash occurred, and any modified pages are discarded. Committing a transaction corresponds to discarding the previous shadow directory. Since recovery involves neither undoing nor redoing data items, this technique can be categorized as a NO-UNDO/NO-REDO technique for recovery.

 

In a multiuser environment with concurrent transactions, logs and checkpoints must be incorporated into the shadow paging technique. One disadvantage of shadow paging is that the updated database pages change location on disk. This makes it difficult to keep related database pages close together on disk without complex storage management strategies. Furthermore, if the directory is large, the overhead of writing shadow directories to disk as transactions commit is significant. A further complication is how to handle garbage collection when a transaction commits. The old pages referenced by the shadow directory that have been updated must be released and added to a list of free pages for future use. These pages are no longer needed after the transaction commits. Another issue is that the operation to migrate between cur-rent and shadow directories must be implemented as an atomic operation.


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