Chapter: Internet & World Wide Web HOW TO PROGRAM - Rich Internet Application Server Technologies - JavaServer™ Faces Web Applications

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Session Tracking - JavaServer

Personalization makes it possible for e-businesses to communicate effectively with their customers and also improves the user’s ability to locate desired products and services.

Session Tracking

 

In the early days of the Internet, e-businesses could not provide the kind of customized service typically experienced in “brick-and-mortar” stores. To address this problem, e-businesses began to establish mechanisms by which they could personalize users’ browsing experiences, tailoring content to individual users while enabling them to bypass irrelevant information. Businesses achieve this level of service by tracking each customer’s movement through their websites and combining the collected data with information provided by the consumer, including billing information, personal preferences, interests and hobbies.

 

Personalization

Personalization makes it possible for e-businesses to communicate effectively with their customers and also improves the user’s ability to locate desired products and services. Companies that provide content of particular interest to users can establish relationships with customers and build on those relationships over time. Furthermore, by targeting con-sumers with personal offers, recommendations, advertisements, promotions and services, e-businesses create customer loyalty. Websites can use sophisticated technology to allow visitors to customize home pages to suit their individual needs and preferences. Similarly, online shopping sites often store personal information for customers, tailoring notifica-tions and special offers to their interests. Such services encourage customers to visit sites and make purchases more frequently.

 

Privacy

A trade-off exists, however, between personalized e-business service and protection of pri-vacy. Some consumers embrace the idea of tailored content, but others fear the possible adverse consequences if the info they provide to e-businesses is released or collected by tracking technologies. Consumers and privacy advocates ask: What if the e-business to which we give personal data sells or gives that information to another organization without  our knowledge? What if we do not want our actions on the Internet—a supposedly anon-ymous medium—to be tracked and recorded by unknown parties? What if unauthorized parties gain access to sensitive private data, such as credit card numbers or medical history? All of these are questions that must be debated and addressed by programmers, consumers, e-businesses and lawmakers alike.

 

Recognizing Clients

 

To provide personalized services to consumers, e-businesses must be able to recognize cli-ents when they request information from a site. As we have discussed, the request/response system on which the web operates is facilitated by HTTP. Unfortunately, HTTP is a state-less protocol—it does not support persistent connections that would enable web servers to maintain state information regarding particular clients. So, web servers cannot determine whether a request comes from a particular client or whether a series of requests comes from one or several clients. To circumvent this problem, sites can provide mechanisms to iden-tify individual clients. A session represents a unique client on a website. If the client leaves a site and then returns later, the client will still be recognized as the same user. To help the server distinguish among clients, each client must identify itself to the server.

 

Tracking individual clients, known as session tracking, can be achieved in a number of ways in JSPs. One popular technique uses cookies (Section 26.5.1); another uses the SessionBean object (Section 26.5.2). Additional session-tracking techniques include using input form elements of type "hidden" and URL rewriting. With "hidden" form ele-ments, a Web Form can write session-tracking data into a form in the web page that it returns to the client in response to a prior request. When the user submits the form in the new web page, all the form data, including the "hidden" fields, is sent to the form handler on the web server. With URL rewriting, the web server embeds session-tracking informa-tion directly in the URLs of hyperlinks that the user clicks to send subsequent requests to the web server.

 

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