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Chapter: Internet & World Wide Web HOW TO PROGRAM - The Ajax Client - Ajax-Enabled Rich Internet Applications

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Rich Internet Applications (RIAs) with Ajax

Ajax improves the user experience by making interactive web applications more responsive.

Rich Internet Applications (RIAs) with Ajax

 

Ajax improves the user experience by making interactive web applications more responsive. Consider a registration form with a number of fields (e.g., first name, last name e-mail address, telephone number, etc.) and a Register (or Submit) button that sends the en-tered data to the server. Usually each field has rules that the user’s entries have to follow (e.g., valid e-mail address, valid telephone number, etc.).

 

When the user clicks Register, a classic XHTML form sends the server all of the data to be validated (Fig. 15.3). While the server is validating the data, the user cannot interact with the page. The server finds invalid data, generates a new page identifying the errors in the form and sends it back to the client—which renders the page in the browser. Once the user fixes the errors and clicks the Register button, the cycle repeats until no errors are found, then the data is stored on the server. The entire page reloads every time the user submits invalid data.

 

Ajax-enabled forms are more interactive. Rather than sending the entire form to be validated, entries are validated dynamically as the user enters data into the fields. For example, consider a website registration form that requires a unique e-mail address. When the user enters an e-mail address into the appropriate field, then moves to the next form field to continue entering data, an asynchronous request is sent to the server to validate the e-mail address. If the e-mail address is not unique, the server sends an error message that is displayed on the page informing the user of the problem (Fig. 15.4). By sending each entry asynchronously, the user can address each invalid entry quickly, versus making edits and resubmitting the entire form repeatedly until all entries are valid. Asynchronous





requests could also be used to fill some fields based on previous fields (e.g., automatically filling in the “city” and “state” fields based on the zip code entered by the user).

 

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