Chapter: Internet & World Wide Web HOW TO PROGRAM - The Ajax Client - Cascading Style Sheets (CSS)

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Cascading Style Sheets™ (CSS)

XHTML was designed to specify the content and structure of a document. Though it has some attributes that control presentation, it is better not to mix presentation with content.

Chapter 5

Cascading Style Sheets(CSS)

 

Introduction

 

In Chapter 4, we introduced the Extensible HyperText Markup Language (XHTML) for marking up information to be rendered in a browser. In this chapter, we shift our focus to formatting and presenting information. To do this, we use a W3C technology called Cas-cading Style Sheets™ (CSS) that allows document authors to specify the presentation of elements on a web page (e.g., fonts, spacing, colors) separately from the structure of the document (section headers, body text, links, etc.). This separation of structure from pre-sentation simplifies maintaining and modifying a web page.

 

XHTML was designed to specify the content and structure of a document. Though it has some attributes that control presentation, it is better not to mix presentation with content. If a website’s presentation is determined entirely by a style sheet, a web designer can simply swap in a new style sheet to completely change the appearance of the site. CSS provides a way to apply style outside of XHTML, allowing the XHTML to dictate the content while the CSS dictates how it’s presented.

 

As with XHTML, the W3C provides a CSS code validator located at jigsaw.w3.org/ css-validator/. It is a good idea to validate all CSS code with this tool to make sure that your code is correct and works on as many browsers as possible.

 

CSS is a large topic. As such, we can introduce only the basic knowledge of CSS that you’ll need to understand the examples and exercises in the rest of the book. For more CSS references and resources, check out our CSS Resource Center at www.deitel.com/css21.

 

The W3C’s CSS specification is currently in its second major version, with a third in development. The current versions of most major browsers support much of the function-ality in CSS 2. This allows programmers to make full use of its features. In this chapter, we introduce CSS, demonstrate some of the features introduced in CSS 2 and discuss some of the upcoming CSS 3 features. As you read this book, open each XHTML docu-ment in your web browser so you can view and interact with it in a web browser, as it was originally intended.

Remember that the examples in this book have been tested in Internet Explorer 7 and Firefox 2. The latest versions of many other browsers (e.g., Safari, Opera, Konqueror) should render this chapter’s examples properly, but we have not tested them. Some exam-ples in this chapter will not work in older browsers, such as Internet Explorer 6 and earlier. Make sure you have either Internet Explorer 7 (Windows only) or Firefox 2 (available for all major platforms) installed before running the examples in this chapter.

 

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