Chapter: Internet & World Wide Web HOW TO PROGRAM - Rich Internet Application Server Technologies - ASP.NET 2.0 and ASP.NET Ajax

| Study Material, Lecturing Notes, Assignment, Reference, Wiki description explanation, brief detail |

ASP.NET 2.0 and ASP.NET Ajax

This chapter introduces web application development with Microsoft’s Active Server Pages .NET (ASP.NET) 2.0 technology. Web-based applications create web content for web-browser clients.

Chapter 25

ASP.NET 2.0  and ASP.NET  Ajax

 

 

Introduction

 

This chapter introduces web application development with Microsoft’s Active Server Pages .NET (ASP.NET) 2.0 technology. Web-based applications create web content for web-browser clients. This web content includes Extensible HyperText Markup Language (XHTML), client-side scripting, images and binary data. If you are not familiar with XHTML, you should read Chapter 4 before studying this chapter. [Note: This chapter as-sumes that you know Visual Basic and are familiar with the .NET platform version 2.0. To learn more about Visual Basic, check out Visual Basic 2005 How to Program, Third Edition, or visit our Visual Basic Resource Center at  www.deitel.com/visualbasic.]

 

We present several examples that demonstrate web application development using Web Forms, web controls (also called ASP.NET server controls) and Visual Basic pro-gramming. We also introduce ASP.NET Ajax and use it to enhance one of the earlier exam-ples. Web Form files have the filename extension .aspx and contain the web page’s GUI. You customize Web Forms by adding web controls including labels, text boxes, images, buttons and other GUI components. The Web Form file generates the web page that is sent to the client browser. From this point onward, we refer to Web Form files as ASPX files.

An ASPX file created in Visual Studio is implemented as a class written in a .NET language, such as Visual Basic. This class contains event handlers, initialization code, utility methods and other supporting code. The file that contains this class is called the code-behind file and provides the ASPX file’s programmatic implementation.

 

To develop the code and GUIs in this chapter, we used Microsoft Visual Web Devel-oper 2005 Express—an IDE designed for developing ASP.NET web applications. Visual Web Developer and Visual Basic 2005 Express share many common features and visual programming tools that simplify building complex applications, such as those that access a database (Sections 25.5–25.6). The full version of Visual Studio 2005 includes the func-tionality of Visual Web Developer, so the instructions we present for Visual Web Devel-oper also apply to Visual Studio 2005. Note that you must install either Visual Web Developer 2005 Express (available from msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/vwd/default.aspx) or a complete version of Visual Studio 2005 to implement the programs in this chapter.

 

Study Material, Lecturing Notes, Assignment, Reference, Wiki description explanation, brief detail


Copyright © 2018-2020 BrainKart.com; All Rights Reserved. Developed by Therithal info, Chennai.